Weight Loss – Four Tips To Prevent A Stall

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Weight Loss – Four Tips To Prevent you from stopping your weight loss programme

Worried about what could be stalling your weight loss progress? Have you been following your diet without missing a beat, seeing good results for the first few weeks and then suddenly, all improvements in your weight loss readings stopped?

You might have been frustrated – ready to toss in the towel. But don’t be so quick to do that just yet! The fact is, you can overcome a weight loss stall with a few smart strategies. Let us look at what you need to know to get this handled…

1. Triple Check Your Counting. One of the main reasons people stop seeing results is they become lazy with their calorie counting. Remember, you must count calories accurately if you hope to see ongoing success. If you mistakenly miscount your calories, this could easily cost you your results.

If you are 200 to 300 calories over each day, this will wipe out the progress you should be seeing.

2. Increase Your Macronutrients. Another thing to try is to raise your number of macros: your carbohydrates, protein, and fats. Or, if you have been using a higher carb diet, try a lower carb one instead as this might jump-start your progress.

Likewise, if you have been on a low-carb diet, try a higher carb one instead. Sometimes a simple switch is all you need.

3. Try A Refeed. If the above fails, you might want to try a refeed. If you have been dieting for weeks on end, a higher calorie day or two could help restart your stalled metabolism, giving you faster progress again.

Try eating 500 to 1000 calories more for one or two days, making most of those calories from carbohydrate foods. Then see if that doesn’t restart fat burning when you move back onto your fat loss plan.

4. Reconsider Your Approach. Finally, if this all fails, you may need to review your calorie intake entirely. Perhaps you need to adjust it down since you have lost weight? Remember weight loss requires continual adjustments, so do not be afraid to make changes as you go about your weight loss plans.

Keep these tips in mind, and you can ensure you continually see progress on your weight loss plan. Anyone who starts making changes to their diet reaps tremendous health benefits almost immediately. One study revealed people who ate a low-fat, high-fiber diet, and who also added forty minutes of physical activity to their day, found…

  • they lowered their blood pressure,
  • improved their cholesterol levels, and
  • reduced their insulin levels

in just three weeks. Just ensure you keep your weight on the downward slope.

Although managing Type 2 diabetes can be very challenging, it is not a condition you must just live with. Make simple changes to your daily routine – include exercise to help lower both your blood sugar levels and your weight.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body.

Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets

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Bariatric surgery could help solve Ireland’s obesity crisis and save the country billions

Weight Loss surgery could help solve Ireland’s obesity crisis and save the country billions

A group of doctors say that, for many people, prevention methods are already too late and other interventions are needed.

lowest price for gastric sleeve surgery in FranceBLifestyle factors only get you so far. To prevent the children who are obese today from becoming adults who are obese in the next 10 years, you have to offer treatment. It’s the only way.

ACCORDING TO THE latest estimates, only one in every 10 Irish men will not be overweight or obese by 2030.

By 2025, we’re set to be one of the most overweight nations in Europe. Already, six in every 10 people in Ireland are overweight.

The HSE says that the cost of adult obesity in Ireland is estimated to be €1.3 billion per annum, €400 million of which is direct healthcare costs. That figure could rise even further in the future, as the population’s weight increases.

While a number of prevention strategies are essential, some doctors say that for people who are already obese, it is already too late.

As a result, a disparate group of health organisations, including Diabetes Ireland, the Irish Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism and Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute, are calling on the government and HSE to introduce a variety of health interventions for overweight or obese people, with surgery one of the main options put forth.

They say that, from a public health and economic point of view, their case is compelling.

“No way of avoiding it”

Dr Grace O’Malley lectures at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and also works at Temple Street Children’s University Hospital.

She told TheJournal.ie that there is a cost-effectiveness in providing surgery for obese people, particularly those with type-2 diabetes, that hasn’t yet been fully explored in Ireland.

O’Malley said that a coordinated approach of GP care, dietitians, chartered physios and clinical psychologists could all play a role, as could surgical interventions.

“The idea of willpower and individual responsibility works to a point, ” she said. “When a disease like obesity has ingrained itself in the body to an extreme level, reversing it through lifestyle approaches becomes harder and harder.

Look to the evidence, currently it suggests that bariatric procedures are effective at reducing morbidity and reducing mortality. It’s actually saving money in the long run because you’re not spending on medication.

So what is bariatric surgery? It can take several different forms. The gold standard surgery comes in two forms – a gastric bypass or gastresctomy – and both are minimally invasive. Within a year of treatment,  a patient’s excess body weight can be cut in half.

Helen Heneghan, bariatric surgeon at St Vincent’s Hospital and St Columcille’s Hospital in Dublin, told TheJournal.ie that the results for obese patients with type-2 diabetes can be drastic.

She said: “Within 24 hours of a gastric bypass for example, we routinely see patients achieve normal blood sugars by the following morning. At least 80% of patients can achieve that a year after surgery. We know five years after that a patient may need medication, but they don’t go back on insulin.

There’s a strong health and economic argument. If you can reduce the cost of treating a type-2 diabetic overnight, it’s quite clear what we need to do.

Huge savings

Up to now, these surgeries have been performed rarely in Ireland. We do just one of these surgeries per 100, 000 population here. It’s 20 times that in the UK. It’s around 80 times that in Sweden.

These doctors, in citing evidence to support their case, mainly draw on international examples but also say that research on the surgeries performed last year in Ireland support their case too.

Taking 15 patients, with hard-to-treat type-2 diabetes, who received bariatric surgery in 2016, a comparison was made between how much they spent on insulin before and how they spent after.

O’Malley said: “Beforehand, they were spending an estimated €8 per day for insulin. After the surgery they were, on average, spending 23 cent a day. And that’s an immediate reduction of 97%. That’s a huge amount.”

Both O’Malley and Heneghan said they wished they could provide more data but, despite hundreds of people on waiting lists, the number of bariatric procedures performed last year was extremely low.

Heneghan said that only being able to provide data from 15 patients was “dismal” while O’Malley said “it’s a shame but that’s all we’ve done”.

Heneghan went on: “No drug treatment can put diabetes into remission like that. It’s a chronic, relentless disease that often leads to damaging, and quite costly, complications.

Things like cardiovascular disease, stroke. It’s hugely costly to our health service.

Weight Loss Surgery Funding

The main barrier to more surgeries being done in Ireland at the moment is funding.

The HSE launched a 10-year plan last year to fight obesity in Ireland, and recently appointed the first national clinical lead in this area,  Professor Donal O’Shea.

“But the new clinical lead is going to need support, ” O’Malley said. “This condition has only really developed over the last 20 years. Financial support is needed to do what needs to be done.”

According to estimates based on figures from the World Health Organisation, the World Bank and an in-depth study of when the surgeries began to be routinely performed in Australia, it would cost about €400 million of investment into providing these surgeries on a wider level nationwide.

“There’s a lot of evidence to show investment will make a difference, ” O’Malley said.

Medication savings alone are a really good argument. And that’s not counting the savings from people not requiring treatment for obesity-related conditions. We’ve kicked our heels for too long. For a lot of people, it may already too late.

How many would benefit from bariatric Surgery?

According to figures provided by Diabetes Ireland, there are around 26, 000 people in the country with type-2 diabetes who are obese.

“The vast majority of these people would benefit from surgery in the near future, ” Heneghan said.

“We want to get to a point of 100 cases a year, ” she said. “But we could easily justify 400 cases a year in Ireland.”

Only two publicly-funded hospitals offer such surgeries – in Galway and Dublin – but of the relatively small number of people on the waiting list, some have been waiting a long time for treatment.

“There around 400 people on waiting lists for bariatric surgery in the country right now, ” Heneghan said. “And some of those would have been waiting for five or six years.”

“They Did it to themselves?”

If the most cost-effective treatment solution is so apparent, then why don’t we offer it routinely in Ireland?

According to the doctors, there are a number of reasons for this and it is partly related to the way society views people with obesity.

Routinely, according to scientific literature cited by the doctors, people who are overweight are told to simply change lifestyle factors and there may be a perception that they “did it to themselves”.

Not so, according to O’Malley. She said: “There are ingrained judgemental attitudes and negative stigma towards people of larger size.

For those of us working in the area, anyone who’s honest would say that when they began working in this field, they’d be quite judgemental too.

She said that it is important to treat obesity as a disease, and approach treatment options to it as such.

“Obesity is now linked with deprivation, ” O’Malley said. “Where there is lower socio-economic status, children are twice as likely to be obese. That can’t be ignored.

If we were talking about the management of cancer, or other chronic disease, thankfully we’ve got to a stage where depending on the stage of that cancer, we have different treatments to offer that person. We don’t – and shouldn’t – withhold treatment based on their disease.

Heneghan added that, for these surgical interventions to be the most effective, action must be taken now.

“There may be tens of thousands who could benefit, ” she said. “We know that if you delay surgery, not only do the costs of treating patients medically accumulate, the likely benefit of the surgery reduced.”

For its part, the HSE said it is committed to following through on its 10-year action plan.

Taking his new role as the HSE’s clinical lead in obesity, Professor O’Shea cited lifestyle factors as important but said that there was “no magic bullet” to fixing the problems.

He said: “Somehow we have to get this whole of government, whole of industry and whole of society approach to come alive – and take obesity on.”

Heneghan added that, with current trends only going upwards in terms of the number of people in Ireland who are overweight or obese, the time to act is now:

We have a window of opportunity over the next few years. We need to seize it before it’s too late. y Sean Murray Thursday 5 Oct 2017, 12:15 AM Oct 5th 2017

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Compare Gastric Band Surgery in France With Things You Practice For Weight Loss That Are Totally Wrong

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Things You Practice For Weight Loss That Are Totally Wrong

1. LOOKING FOR A QUICK FIX!

A fact about weight loss which catches most of the people unaware is that nearly 99% of diets are designed in a manner that they trick your body into losing weight.

In most cases, these diets are focused on cutting out a macronutrient group, such as proteins, carbs or fats altogether so as to limit calories.

But this sets one up for failure, always and without a fail! And that is because you can only trick your body in the short term. Over time, the body will rebel back, and you may even end up gaining some extra pounds!

What we sometimes fail to understand is that it is very important for an individual to be healthy to lose weight. And if weight loss is your priority, the best way to go about is putting in place a multifaceted approach to get healthy!

This way, you’d come to realize that weight loss is achieved naturally, and this would be weight loss which is sustainable, and successful!

2. OVER-EXERCISING WHILE CUTTING CALORIES When one gets too much exercise while one’s diet is poor or calorie count is low, it sends your body running for safety, and it makes up by slowing down the metabolism. With a chronic energy deficit, wherein you have fewer calories coming in than going out, the body over time starts believing that food is scarce. And as a result, the body begins to hold on to fat, simply as a way to safeguard itself. So the struggle for weight loss is made counter-productive.

 

3. A LOW PROTEIN DIET

A low protein diet is almost sure to slow down the process of weight loss. This is mainly because liver and detoxification processes are protein dependent.

So while a low protein diet does not augur well for weight loss, it does not augur well for long term health as well!

4. CUT OUT ALL THINGS CATEGORISED AS SUGAR

While cutting out some sugars like candies, sweetened sodas and fake sweeteners may be fine, you might have to take care that you hold on to the truly nourishing sugars that you get from fresh fruits, fresh fruit juices or even honey!

Glycogen is necessary to convert the inactive thyroid hormone into the active form and keep the metabolism working well. But if you cut out the sugars completely, this hinders the body’s natural ability to store glycogen!

In the same way, one needs to take care that one does not cut out too many potassium rich fruits, such as bananas and papaya because it affects the thyroid function even more.

 

5. DEPRIVING YOUR BODY

In actual practice, excessive weight might signify a nutritional deficit. So one must try and make sure that one doesn’t deprive one’s body of nutrients, and goes for a diet which is high on nutrition. This would make sure that your cravings reduce by themselves over time. So it’s all about listening to your body.

6. FAT FREE DIETS

One has to try and make sure that one balances his diet instead of cutting out all fat from the diet!

Cutting out fat completely from your diet would rob you of fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K, because these nutrients are found only in fats.

And in the same coin this deprives the body of nutrition, which is weight loss’s worst enemy!

The key is to be patient with your body, because weight loss doesn’t happen overnight. You just need to listen to your body’s cravings and fuel it right!

If you are looking forward to lose weight, look good and feel great, you must check out the slimming section at Telesky Shopping. Some of the highlights among selections are some 100% herbal products, which enable you to lose weight without having to bring about a change in your lifestyle patterns

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Or you could opt for the natural sweeteners in the list, which are nutritious, keep the body supple, such that the cravings for sugar are gone. And as you work towards weight loss, you effectively fight diabetes as well

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Weight-Loss Surgery: Durable in the Long-Term

Benefits of gastric bypass surgery

In a recent report about the long term benefits of gastric bypass surgery good results were still being seen 12 years post-operative, an observational study found.

People with severe obesity who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reported a sustained body weight reduction 12 years following surgery (-77.2 lbs from baseline, 95% CI -84.7 to -70.0, mean % change -26.9%), according to Ted D. Adams, PhD, MPH, of Intermountain Healthcare, and colleagues in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Previously reported 2-year and 6-year observational data from this cohort were published by the research group to assess the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent gastric bypass, and was later ” broadened to include the durability and long-term outcomes of gastric bypass compared to severely obese patients who did not undergo surgical intervention,” Adams told MedPage Today. “We hoped to see similar favorable outcomes at 12 years.”

With over a 90% follow-up rate at 12-years, the analysis included 1,156 severely obese patients — 418 of whom underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Comprising of two nonsurgical comparative groups, there were 417 patients who sought out surgery, but did not undergo surgery mainly due to insurance coverage (non-surgery group 1). ‘Nonsurgery group 2’ comprised of a total of 321 severely obese people, who did not seek out surgery. All nonsurgery participants were not provided with any study-based weight loss therapy, however, they were free to independently pursue such intervention. After 12 years, neither nonsurgery group achieved a significant mean change in weight loss:

  • Group 1: -6.4 lbs (-15.2 to -2.2, mean change -2.0%)
  • Group 2: -0.0 lbs (-7.7 to 7.7, mean change -0.9%)

Two years after gastric bypass, the surgery group reported a significant adjusted mean body weight change of -99.2 lbs from baseline (95 % CI -104.1 to 94.6 lb; mean percent change -35.0%). Similar benefits were also seen at 6 years out of surgery, with a sustained loss of -80.0 lbs mean body weight change from baseline (95% CI, -86.0 to -73.9 lb, mean percent change -28.0).

“The fact that the mean 12-year percent weight loss from baseline was very similar to that measured at 6 years follow-up was somewhat of a surprise,” Adams noted.

Weight loss wasn’t the only benefit sustained 12 years after surgery. Two years post-op, 75% of surgery patients with type 2 diabetes achieved remission (66 of 88), and 62% sustained 6-years post-op (54 of 87). At the 12-year follow-up, over half of patients who had type 2 diabetes at time of surgery remained in remission (43 of 84, 51%), with Adams calling this finding “encouraging.” The odds ratio for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 1 was 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.24), while the OR for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 2 was 0.09 (95% CI 0.03-0.29)(P<0.001 for both).

Rates of diabetes remission were largely predicted by therapies used at baseline. Surgery patients who were not receiving antidiabetic medications as baseline were more likely to achieve remission after surgery (73%, 95% CI 46-99, 16 of 22), while 56% of those who were receiving oral medications at baseline achieved post-op remission (95% CI 35-77, 24 of 43). Only 16% of patients receiving insulin with or without other oral agents at baseline achieved remission (95% CI -8 to 39, three of 19).

However, even in surgery patients who did not achieve remission, a significant improvement was still reported after 12 years, with a decreased mean in the amount of antidiabetic medications compared to both nonsurgery group 1 (-0.3± versus 0.8, P=0.002) and nonsurgery group 2 (-0.3 versus 1.1, P<0.001).

Several cardiovascular-related benefits were also reported after 12 years among the surgery group, with significant remission rates reported for HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to both nonsurgical groups. Long term hypertension benefit was also reported following surgical intervention, although rate of remission was only significant when compared to the first nonsurgical group (adjusted OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.7-15.6, P<0.001).

In a statement to MedPage Today, Paul Thodiyil, MD, director of the Bariatric Surgery Program at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, called this study “important,” and praised the long-term follow-up to assess the benefits of bariatric surgery, and specifically, the gastric bypass procedure.

“While, sadly, it confirms an increased incidence of suicides in those undergoing weight loss surgery [five in the surgery group; two in nonsurgery group 1], the overall gains are substantial,” said Thodiyil, referring to the significant weight loss and diabetes benefits sustained long term. He was not involved with the study,

 Adams said that his group hopes to continue to follow both the surgical and nonsurgical participant cohorts into the future

Vegan, paleo and ketogenic diet weight loss recipes with diet food swaps

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Vegan, paleo and ketogenic diet weight loss recipes with diet food swaps

I have lost 100 pounds using a variety of diet tips and tricks. I don’t follow a specific weight loss diet because there’s no one meal plan that hits everything I’m looking for. So I do like they say in the Al-Anon slogans, “take what you like and leave the rest.”

 The ‘how I lost 100 pounds’ diet

My eating strategies are culled from a variety of #weight loss programs. The #Ketogenic Diet, South Beach, hypertension DASH diet, paleo, Mediterranean Diet, Weight Watchers and more. Some of my favorite weight loss tricks are food swaps. Using the “eat this, not that” and “hungry girl” concepts, I create recipes that trade fatty, sugary, salty, junky ingredients for healthier, low-calorie ones.

I package them like Nutrisystem does, for ease of use.

Religious fasting

I also follow many of the dietary fasts and restrictions of other religions. I’m not a Muslim, but Islam‘s halal foods are typically healthier. So are Jewish fasts and kosher foods. I am Catholic and observe Lent, but I try to do it all year-long. Many celebrities are preaching diets that have been put together centuries ago by different religions. Even doctors recommend some fasting (I say even because I got very little help with weight loss from the medical community, aside from bariatric surgery or gastric bypass advice). So I’m not to het up over traditional medicine.

Vegan and diabetic diets

Arguably, vegan or at least vegetarian is how we should all be eating. Supergirl Gabrielle Union says she’s imitating the fittest women who are vegan.
I’m not diabetic but before I lost weight my glucose number was getting higher. I was tentatively diagnosed with pre-diabetes (aka insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome). So I try to avoid refined sugar as if I had Type 2 diabetes.

Superfood bowls

“Bowling” is not only a sport but a trendy eating style just now. It just means eating food in bowls, typically based on salad. Now I adore pasta and potato salads and cole slaw. But made the usual way, sloppy with mayo, sugar, etc., they are calorie-bombs. So I put together a to-die-for coleslaw recipe you could literally live on. It’s vegan, superfood-dense, protein-rich, diabetic, bad fat-free, ketogenic (high in good fatty acids) low sodium, gluten-free, sugarfree and a meal in itself. Oh, and it’s super cheap to make. And my diet recipe is pretty too! See the picture above! (Those aren’t bugs, lol, but seeds)

Superfood kale slaw bowl

chopped kale with stems removed

coarsely grated carrots

chopped green and purple cabbage

cubed salad cucumbers (much tastier than other cukes)

chopped zucchini

sliced grape tomatoes

cashews and/or walnuts and/or almonds

pumpkin seeds

milled flaxseed

chia seeds

unsweetened dried strawberries, cranberries or blueberries

dash liquid smoke

apple cider, acai or pomegranate vinegar

whole seed, Dijon or horseradish mustard

lemon juice and zest

100% juice, raw honey (omit if making vegan) or blue agave syrup (optional)

Chop, slice, toss ingredients, season to taste with vinegar, mustard juice or honey, and enjoy.

This kale slaw is sweet enough for me without any honey or juice. But you may like it sweeter. Go easy on the juice and dried fruit as they are full of sugar and will spike glucose levels. #Gluten Free

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How to Control Your Hunger Hormones to Lose Weight and Keep It Off

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How to Control Your Hunger Hormones to Lose Weight and Keep It Off

Think of it as the gremlin making your stomach grumble.

Can you really reprogram your appetite?

Amanda Gardner

December 19, 2017

A symphony of factors control hunger, fullness, and ultimately our weight, including everything from how well you slept last night to the accounts you follow on Instagram. Also involved in the complex process are hormones, particularly the two that are often referred to as hunger hormones, leptin and ghrelin.

In an ideal world, leptin and ghrelin work together to help keep you at a healthy weight. In the real world, well, 70% of the population ends up overweight or obese. Could out-of-whack hormones be to blame?

To answer that question, you first have to understand how the so-called hunger hormones work.

Leptin is the satiety hormone. Essentially, it tells you when to stop eating. “It makes you feel full, and it blocks appetite,” says James Shoemaker, MD, PhD, associate professor in biochemistry and molecular biology at St. Louis University.

 Ghrelin, on the other hand, tells you when you’re hungry and need to eat. Think of it as the gremlin making your stomach grumble. “It’s made in the stomach primarily, and it’s released when you haven’t eaten for a while,” says Michael Schwartz, MD, co-director of the Diabetes Institute at the University of Washington in Seattle. Ghrelin peaks every four hours or so–roughly corresponding to breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

When everything’s running smoothly, the two hormones work in harmony, says Philadelphia-based Marjorie Nolan Cohn, RDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics. “As one is rising, the other one is dropping.”

But things can–and do–go wrong.

For starters, leptin levels fluctuate with how much fat you have. When you lose weight, leptin levels drop. With less of that appetite-suppressing hormone, you end up feeling hungrier and eating more, potentially causing you to gain back the weight you had lost. “[Once] you have returned to your baseline weight, leptin will have recovered,” explains Dr. Schwartz.

In fact, a study that looked at 14 former Biggest Loser contestants showed that, indeed, leptin levels declined in those who lost large amounts of weight (they lost an average of almost 130 pounds). That could explain why most of them regained much of the weight over time.

It’s also possible to become desensitized to leptin–called leptin resistance–if you are constantly stuffing yourself with food. “You’d think that if you’re eating a lot you shouldn’t be hungry, but it’s the opposite,” says Cohn, who is also author of The Belly Fat Fix: Taming Ghrelin, Your Hunger Hormone, for Quick, Healthy Weight Loss. “Even though there may be leptin in circulation, it’s not registering,” she says, and you don’t know you’re full.

Hunger-stimulating ghrelin levels also vary with weight loss. After dieting, ghrelin production increases, potentially causing people to eat more and gain weight. “The cravings can be so hard to control,” says Cohn. “Once you’re out of whack, it’s really hard to get back into balance.”

Why our bodies fight back

Understandably, human beings are designed to fight starvation. Part of the body’s response to dieting is a drive to revert to whatever weight we were previously. “As you gain weight, the brain thinks that the new weight is the one that’s supposed to be regulated,” says Dr. Schwartz. “That’s why it’s so hard to lose weight and keep it off.”

That response typically kicks in after you’ve lost around 5% to 7% of your bodyweight, he says. “Once you lose more than 5% of your bodyweight, on average, you’re going to engage these responses that counter-regulate against the weight loss. Whether you do it quickly or slowly, it doesn’t matter very much.”

Interestingly, people who undergo bariatric surgery seem to have lower levels of hunger-promoting ghrelin than people who take pounds off through plain old diet and exercise. This may be why weight loss after gastric bypass surgery tends to last for longer periods of time.

Harnessing your hormones

Barring surgery, is there any way you can control these hormones to your advantage? Luckily, yes.

If you can, stick to a more moderate weight loss of just around 5% of your bodyweight so you don’t trigger that debilitating drop in leptin. Then, readjust mealtime: “Eat on the clock,” says Cohn. That means every two hours if you like to eat smaller portions or every four hours if you eat larger meals. This draws down stomach-grumbling ghrelin levels.

It’s also important to eat a balance of foods at each meal, particularly protein and complex carbs. “Protein is a major player in suppressing ghrelin,” Cohn says. “It takes more work to digest and keeps you full longer.” Fiber also slows digestion and helps keep you full, she adds. Look for complex carbs like whole grains, veggies, and fruit, especially those containing a type of fiber known as “resistant starch,” like not-quite-ripe bananas.

Exercise may also help control your hunger hormones so you can shed pounds for good. One study found that losing weight on a treadmill resulted in lower ghrelin levels than slimming down by simply eating less.

This may be why weight loss after gastric bypass surgery tends to last for longer periods of time.

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Is It Possible to Lose Weight and Never Put It Back on Again?

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Is It Possible to Lose Weight and Never Put It Back on Again?Losing weight is relatively easy! The more difficult task is to maintain it. One of the most complaint subjects in terms of dieting and weight loss is related to maintaining your weight once you achieved your goals and not putting it back on.See all stories on this topic

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Chrissy Metz is tired of questions about her body, weight-loss surgery

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Chrissy Metz is tired of questions about her body, weight loss surgery

“The question I wish people would stop asking me is, ‘Are you having weight loss surgery? Are you gonna be doing a gastric bypass? Are you?’ Um, what?” Chrissy Metz revealed on the Today show on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. “Some people do feel like they’re my doctors and they have tried to diagnose me on the internet. So that’s…that’s weird. ‘Cause like, I’m good. I’m good, boo. But thanks! But I’m good.”

According to Us Weekly, the Emmy nominee previously opened up about her character Kate’s weight-loss journey on This Is Us, as she decided to undergo gastric bypass surgery in the NBC series’ first season. “It is a fast fix and it’s not always the right answer,” the former American Horror Story actress explained during her December 2016 appearance on The Ellen Show. “I think with the character, Kate, she wants a quick fix because it’s not about the food. Food is the symptom. We’ll get to see all the details.”

Metz, 36, also revealed last November that she is contractually obligated to shed some pounds. “In our contact, it did state that would be a part of it, to lose the weight in the trajectory of the character as she comes to find herself,” she told TVLine, adding that she doesn’t mind. “That was a win-win for me. Because it’s one thing to try to do it on your own. But as human beings, it’s an ego thing: We’re more likely to do something for someone else.”

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New research examines the impact of so-called crash diets, also known as very low-calorie diets, on heart function. The findings call for more careful cardiac monitoring in people trying to lose weight.