What Is Your Obesity Delivery Method?

Compare cost of Gastric Banding Surgery In Europe how much does a gastric band cost What Is Your Obesity Delivery Method?Wow this sounds like a bit of a cruel question, but it is a vitally important question to ask yourself if you are struggling with your weight and you would like to stop the obesity cycle. Also the question might seem obvious but it is more complex than first meets the eye. There are 4 obesity delivery methods.See all stories on this topic

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She still wants his babies. Lauren Goodger ‘desperate to get her Size 8 body back

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She still wants his infants ‘: Lauren Goodger ‘ determined to obtain her Dimension 8 body back in a proposal to …

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considering dropping the weight loss surgery path and getting a gastric band. See all stories on this topic

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Mariah Carey Underwent gastric Sleeve Surgery 6 Weeks Ago

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Mariah Carey has undergone gastric sleeve surgery.

The GRAMMY winner, who showed off a slimmer figure at her hand and footprint ceremony at the TCL Chinese Theatre in Hollywood last Wednesday, underwent the weight loss surgery about six weeks ago, sources tell ET.

Carey got the gastric sleeve surgery for weight loss which shrinks the size of the stomach so patients eat less, which is considered to be one of the  fastest weight loss plan for women, after feeling “extremely insecure about her weight,” one source tells ET.

“She always fluctuates and it makes her upset,” the source says. “She lives in denial about it; she has the tags cut out of clothes, so she can be blissfully unaware of her size.”

A second source tells ET that Carey, who feels “much better about herself” now, adding, “this is a new beginning for her.”

Carey’s rep would not comment on her weight loss surgery. Page Six was first to report the news.

Another part of the singer’s new beginning is wrapping up her Las Vegas residency at Caesars Palace and moving on to The Venetian in March 2018. According to the source, Carey has signed a “two-year deal contingent upon how well the show does in the first year.”

When reached for comment, The Venetian Las Vegas would not confirm the news, telling ET they’re “consistently engaged in discussions with a number of today’s top artists regarding residencies, and we are always interested in having artists of the caliber of Mariah Carey perform at our venues.”

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Can Being Overweight Lead to Breast Cancer?

Can Being Overweight Lead to Breast Cancer?…

lowest price for gastric sleeve surgery in FranceBy Nick Nicholson, MD

The statistics surrounding breast cancer are staggering. One in eight women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. More than 315,000 women will receive a new breast cancer diagnosis this year alone. Breast cancer claims the lives of more women in the U.S. than any other cancer, except lung cancer. (Source:breastcancer.org)

There are multiple factors that have been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer: gender , age, race, family history, genetic mutations and weight. While we have no control over most of these factors, one thing we can manage or control is our weight, and doing so is essential to preventing life-threatening diseases, such as cancer.

It’s important to note that while breast cancer is most common in women, about 2,400 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in men this year. About one  in 1,000 men will develop breast cancer in his lifetime.

Many research studies have shown a link between a higher BMI (a measure of body fat percentage based on height and weight) and an increase in risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. According to the National Cancer Institute, women who are overweight or obese may be as much as 40 percent more likely to develop breast cancer compared with normal weight women.

Why are postmenopausal women who are overweight or obese more likely to develop breast cancer? One word: estrogen. Fatty tissue is the largest source of estrogen production for postmenopausal women. Fat contains an enzyme called aromatase that converts hormones called androgens to estrogens. Carrying excess weight means higher estrogen levels, and women with higher estrogen levels are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer compared to women with lower estrogen levels.

Are you at risk of breast cancer due to obesity? According to the National Institutes of Health, adults with a body mass index (BMI) 30.0 or higher are considered obese. Adults with a BMI between 25.0 and 29.9 are considered overweight. Use this BMI calculator from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to calculate your BMI.

Women who are overweight or obese can reduce their risk of breast cancer by losing weight. Research from the Nurses’ Health Study found that women who lost weight and kept it off for at least four years after menopause were 40 percent less likely to develop breast cancer. Weight loss surgery has been proven an effective tool at helping women lose weight and reduce their cancer risk. Women who have undergone bariatric surgery may be 83 percent less likely to develop cancer. A reduced risk of cancer after weight loss surgery is due not only to a reduction in fatty tissue, but to changes in body chemistry that promote disease prevention and symptom control.

If you are overweight or obese, contact us today to learn how weight loss surgery can help improve your health and reduce your risk of cancer.

About the Author

One of the most experienced weight loss surgeons in the country along with a full staff of surgeons, nurses and other experienced clinicians, help patients reverse obesity with LAP-BAND, Gastric Bypass, Sleeve Gastrectomy, Gastric Balloon and Revisions.

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Weight Loss – Four Tips To Prevent A Stall

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Weight Loss – Four Tips To Prevent you from stopping your weight loss programme

Worried about what could be stalling your weight loss progress? Have you been following your diet without missing a beat, seeing good results for the first few weeks and then suddenly, all improvements in your weight loss readings stopped?

You might have been frustrated – ready to toss in the towel. But don’t be so quick to do that just yet! The fact is, you can overcome a weight loss stall with a few smart strategies. Let us look at what you need to know to get this handled…

1. Triple Check Your Counting. One of the main reasons people stop seeing results is they become lazy with their calorie counting. Remember, you must count calories accurately if you hope to see ongoing success. If you mistakenly miscount your calories, this could easily cost you your results.

If you are 200 to 300 calories over each day, this will wipe out the progress you should be seeing.

2. Increase Your Macronutrients. Another thing to try is to raise your number of macros: your carbohydrates, protein, and fats. Or, if you have been using a higher carb diet, try a lower carb one instead as this might jump-start your progress.

Likewise, if you have been on a low-carb diet, try a higher carb one instead. Sometimes a simple switch is all you need.

3. Try A Refeed. If the above fails, you might want to try a refeed. If you have been dieting for weeks on end, a higher calorie day or two could help restart your stalled metabolism, giving you faster progress again.

Try eating 500 to 1000 calories more for one or two days, making most of those calories from carbohydrate foods. Then see if that doesn’t restart fat burning when you move back onto your fat loss plan.

4. Reconsider Your Approach. Finally, if this all fails, you may need to review your calorie intake entirely. Perhaps you need to adjust it down since you have lost weight? Remember weight loss requires continual adjustments, so do not be afraid to make changes as you go about your weight loss plans.

Keep these tips in mind, and you can ensure you continually see progress on your weight loss plan. Anyone who starts making changes to their diet reaps tremendous health benefits almost immediately. One study revealed people who ate a low-fat, high-fiber diet, and who also added forty minutes of physical activity to their day, found…

  • they lowered their blood pressure,
  • improved their cholesterol levels, and
  • reduced their insulin levels

in just three weeks. Just ensure you keep your weight on the downward slope.

Although managing Type 2 diabetes can be very challenging, it is not a condition you must just live with. Make simple changes to your daily routine – include exercise to help lower both your blood sugar levels and your weight.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body.

Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9774969

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Bariatric surgery could help solve Ireland’s obesity crisis and save the country billions

Weight Loss surgery could help solve Ireland’s obesity crisis and save the country billions

A group of doctors say that, for many people, prevention methods are already too late and other interventions are needed.

lowest price for gastric sleeve surgery in FranceBLifestyle factors only get you so far. To prevent the children who are obese today from becoming adults who are obese in the next 10 years, you have to offer treatment. It’s the only way.

ACCORDING TO THE latest estimates, only one in every 10 Irish men will not be overweight or obese by 2030.

By 2025, we’re set to be one of the most overweight nations in Europe. Already, six in every 10 people in Ireland are overweight.

The HSE says that the cost of adult obesity in Ireland is estimated to be €1.3 billion per annum, €400 million of which is direct healthcare costs. That figure could rise even further in the future, as the population’s weight increases.

While a number of prevention strategies are essential, some doctors say that for people who are already obese, it is already too late.

As a result, a disparate group of health organisations, including Diabetes Ireland, the Irish Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism and Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute, are calling on the government and HSE to introduce a variety of health interventions for overweight or obese people, with surgery one of the main options put forth.

They say that, from a public health and economic point of view, their case is compelling.

“No way of avoiding it”

Dr Grace O’Malley lectures at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and also works at Temple Street Children’s University Hospital.

She told TheJournal.ie that there is a cost-effectiveness in providing surgery for obese people, particularly those with type-2 diabetes, that hasn’t yet been fully explored in Ireland.

O’Malley said that a coordinated approach of GP care, dietitians, chartered physios and clinical psychologists could all play a role, as could surgical interventions.

“The idea of willpower and individual responsibility works to a point, ” she said. “When a disease like obesity has ingrained itself in the body to an extreme level, reversing it through lifestyle approaches becomes harder and harder.

Look to the evidence, currently it suggests that bariatric procedures are effective at reducing morbidity and reducing mortality. It’s actually saving money in the long run because you’re not spending on medication.

So what is bariatric surgery? It can take several different forms. The gold standard surgery comes in two forms – a gastric bypass or gastresctomy – and both are minimally invasive. Within a year of treatment,  a patient’s excess body weight can be cut in half.

Helen Heneghan, bariatric surgeon at St Vincent’s Hospital and St Columcille’s Hospital in Dublin, told TheJournal.ie that the results for obese patients with type-2 diabetes can be drastic.

She said: “Within 24 hours of a gastric bypass for example, we routinely see patients achieve normal blood sugars by the following morning. At least 80% of patients can achieve that a year after surgery. We know five years after that a patient may need medication, but they don’t go back on insulin.

There’s a strong health and economic argument. If you can reduce the cost of treating a type-2 diabetic overnight, it’s quite clear what we need to do.

Huge savings

Up to now, these surgeries have been performed rarely in Ireland. We do just one of these surgeries per 100, 000 population here. It’s 20 times that in the UK. It’s around 80 times that in Sweden.

These doctors, in citing evidence to support their case, mainly draw on international examples but also say that research on the surgeries performed last year in Ireland support their case too.

Taking 15 patients, with hard-to-treat type-2 diabetes, who received bariatric surgery in 2016, a comparison was made between how much they spent on insulin before and how they spent after.

O’Malley said: “Beforehand, they were spending an estimated €8 per day for insulin. After the surgery they were, on average, spending 23 cent a day. And that’s an immediate reduction of 97%. That’s a huge amount.”

Both O’Malley and Heneghan said they wished they could provide more data but, despite hundreds of people on waiting lists, the number of bariatric procedures performed last year was extremely low.

Heneghan said that only being able to provide data from 15 patients was “dismal” while O’Malley said “it’s a shame but that’s all we’ve done”.

Heneghan went on: “No drug treatment can put diabetes into remission like that. It’s a chronic, relentless disease that often leads to damaging, and quite costly, complications.

Things like cardiovascular disease, stroke. It’s hugely costly to our health service.

Weight Loss Surgery Funding

The main barrier to more surgeries being done in Ireland at the moment is funding.

The HSE launched a 10-year plan last year to fight obesity in Ireland, and recently appointed the first national clinical lead in this area,  Professor Donal O’Shea.

“But the new clinical lead is going to need support, ” O’Malley said. “This condition has only really developed over the last 20 years. Financial support is needed to do what needs to be done.”

According to estimates based on figures from the World Health Organisation, the World Bank and an in-depth study of when the surgeries began to be routinely performed in Australia, it would cost about €400 million of investment into providing these surgeries on a wider level nationwide.

“There’s a lot of evidence to show investment will make a difference, ” O’Malley said.

Medication savings alone are a really good argument. And that’s not counting the savings from people not requiring treatment for obesity-related conditions. We’ve kicked our heels for too long. For a lot of people, it may already too late.

How many would benefit from bariatric Surgery?

According to figures provided by Diabetes Ireland, there are around 26, 000 people in the country with type-2 diabetes who are obese.

“The vast majority of these people would benefit from surgery in the near future, ” Heneghan said.

“We want to get to a point of 100 cases a year, ” she said. “But we could easily justify 400 cases a year in Ireland.”

Only two publicly-funded hospitals offer such surgeries – in Galway and Dublin – but of the relatively small number of people on the waiting list, some have been waiting a long time for treatment.

“There around 400 people on waiting lists for bariatric surgery in the country right now, ” Heneghan said. “And some of those would have been waiting for five or six years.”

“They Did it to themselves?”

If the most cost-effective treatment solution is so apparent, then why don’t we offer it routinely in Ireland?

According to the doctors, there are a number of reasons for this and it is partly related to the way society views people with obesity.

Routinely, according to scientific literature cited by the doctors, people who are overweight are told to simply change lifestyle factors and there may be a perception that they “did it to themselves”.

Not so, according to O’Malley. She said: “There are ingrained judgemental attitudes and negative stigma towards people of larger size.

For those of us working in the area, anyone who’s honest would say that when they began working in this field, they’d be quite judgemental too.

She said that it is important to treat obesity as a disease, and approach treatment options to it as such.

“Obesity is now linked with deprivation, ” O’Malley said. “Where there is lower socio-economic status, children are twice as likely to be obese. That can’t be ignored.

If we were talking about the management of cancer, or other chronic disease, thankfully we’ve got to a stage where depending on the stage of that cancer, we have different treatments to offer that person. We don’t – and shouldn’t – withhold treatment based on their disease.

Heneghan added that, for these surgical interventions to be the most effective, action must be taken now.

“There may be tens of thousands who could benefit, ” she said. “We know that if you delay surgery, not only do the costs of treating patients medically accumulate, the likely benefit of the surgery reduced.”

For its part, the HSE said it is committed to following through on its 10-year action plan.

Taking his new role as the HSE’s clinical lead in obesity, Professor O’Shea cited lifestyle factors as important but said that there was “no magic bullet” to fixing the problems.

He said: “Somehow we have to get this whole of government, whole of industry and whole of society approach to come alive – and take obesity on.”

Heneghan added that, with current trends only going upwards in terms of the number of people in Ireland who are overweight or obese, the time to act is now:

We have a window of opportunity over the next few years. We need to seize it before it’s too late. y Sean Murray Thursday 5 Oct 2017, 12:15 AM Oct 5th 2017

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Compare Gastric Band Surgery in France With Things You Practice For Weight Loss That Are Totally Wrong

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Things You Practice For Weight Loss That Are Totally Wrong

1. LOOKING FOR A QUICK FIX!

A fact about weight loss which catches most of the people unaware is that nearly 99% of diets are designed in a manner that they trick your body into losing weight.

In most cases, these diets are focused on cutting out a macronutrient group, such as proteins, carbs or fats altogether so as to limit calories.

But this sets one up for failure, always and without a fail! And that is because you can only trick your body in the short term. Over time, the body will rebel back, and you may even end up gaining some extra pounds!

What we sometimes fail to understand is that it is very important for an individual to be healthy to lose weight. And if weight loss is your priority, the best way to go about is putting in place a multifaceted approach to get healthy!

This way, you’d come to realize that weight loss is achieved naturally, and this would be weight loss which is sustainable, and successful!

2. OVER-EXERCISING WHILE CUTTING CALORIES When one gets too much exercise while one’s diet is poor or calorie count is low, it sends your body running for safety, and it makes up by slowing down the metabolism. With a chronic energy deficit, wherein you have fewer calories coming in than going out, the body over time starts believing that food is scarce. And as a result, the body begins to hold on to fat, simply as a way to safeguard itself. So the struggle for weight loss is made counter-productive.

 

3. A LOW PROTEIN DIET

A low protein diet is almost sure to slow down the process of weight loss. This is mainly because liver and detoxification processes are protein dependent.

So while a low protein diet does not augur well for weight loss, it does not augur well for long term health as well!

4. CUT OUT ALL THINGS CATEGORISED AS SUGAR

While cutting out some sugars like candies, sweetened sodas and fake sweeteners may be fine, you might have to take care that you hold on to the truly nourishing sugars that you get from fresh fruits, fresh fruit juices or even honey!

Glycogen is necessary to convert the inactive thyroid hormone into the active form and keep the metabolism working well. But if you cut out the sugars completely, this hinders the body’s natural ability to store glycogen!

In the same way, one needs to take care that one does not cut out too many potassium rich fruits, such as bananas and papaya because it affects the thyroid function even more.

 

5. DEPRIVING YOUR BODY

In actual practice, excessive weight might signify a nutritional deficit. So one must try and make sure that one doesn’t deprive one’s body of nutrients, and goes for a diet which is high on nutrition. This would make sure that your cravings reduce by themselves over time. So it’s all about listening to your body.

6. FAT FREE DIETS

One has to try and make sure that one balances his diet instead of cutting out all fat from the diet!

Cutting out fat completely from your diet would rob you of fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K, because these nutrients are found only in fats.

And in the same coin this deprives the body of nutrition, which is weight loss’s worst enemy!

The key is to be patient with your body, because weight loss doesn’t happen overnight. You just need to listen to your body’s cravings and fuel it right!

If you are looking forward to lose weight, look good and feel great, you must check out the slimming section at Telesky Shopping. Some of the highlights among selections are some 100% herbal products, which enable you to lose weight without having to bring about a change in your lifestyle patterns

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Or you could opt for the natural sweeteners in the list, which are nutritious, keep the body supple, such that the cravings for sugar are gone. And as you work towards weight loss, you effectively fight diabetes as well

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Weight-Loss Surgery: Durable in the Long-Term

Benefits of gastric bypass surgery

In a recent report about the long term benefits of gastric bypass surgery good results were still being seen 12 years post-operative, an observational study found.

People with severe obesity who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reported a sustained body weight reduction 12 years following surgery (-77.2 lbs from baseline, 95% CI -84.7 to -70.0, mean % change -26.9%), according to Ted D. Adams, PhD, MPH, of Intermountain Healthcare, and colleagues in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Previously reported 2-year and 6-year observational data from this cohort were published by the research group to assess the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent gastric bypass, and was later ” broadened to include the durability and long-term outcomes of gastric bypass compared to severely obese patients who did not undergo surgical intervention,” Adams told MedPage Today. “We hoped to see similar favorable outcomes at 12 years.”

With over a 90% follow-up rate at 12-years, the analysis included 1,156 severely obese patients — 418 of whom underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Comprising of two nonsurgical comparative groups, there were 417 patients who sought out surgery, but did not undergo surgery mainly due to insurance coverage (non-surgery group 1). ‘Nonsurgery group 2’ comprised of a total of 321 severely obese people, who did not seek out surgery. All nonsurgery participants were not provided with any study-based weight loss therapy, however, they were free to independently pursue such intervention. After 12 years, neither nonsurgery group achieved a significant mean change in weight loss:

  • Group 1: -6.4 lbs (-15.2 to -2.2, mean change -2.0%)
  • Group 2: -0.0 lbs (-7.7 to 7.7, mean change -0.9%)

Two years after gastric bypass, the surgery group reported a significant adjusted mean body weight change of -99.2 lbs from baseline (95 % CI -104.1 to 94.6 lb; mean percent change -35.0%). Similar benefits were also seen at 6 years out of surgery, with a sustained loss of -80.0 lbs mean body weight change from baseline (95% CI, -86.0 to -73.9 lb, mean percent change -28.0).

“The fact that the mean 12-year percent weight loss from baseline was very similar to that measured at 6 years follow-up was somewhat of a surprise,” Adams noted.

Weight loss wasn’t the only benefit sustained 12 years after surgery. Two years post-op, 75% of surgery patients with type 2 diabetes achieved remission (66 of 88), and 62% sustained 6-years post-op (54 of 87). At the 12-year follow-up, over half of patients who had type 2 diabetes at time of surgery remained in remission (43 of 84, 51%), with Adams calling this finding “encouraging.” The odds ratio for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 1 was 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.24), while the OR for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 2 was 0.09 (95% CI 0.03-0.29)(P<0.001 for both).

Rates of diabetes remission were largely predicted by therapies used at baseline. Surgery patients who were not receiving antidiabetic medications as baseline were more likely to achieve remission after surgery (73%, 95% CI 46-99, 16 of 22), while 56% of those who were receiving oral medications at baseline achieved post-op remission (95% CI 35-77, 24 of 43). Only 16% of patients receiving insulin with or without other oral agents at baseline achieved remission (95% CI -8 to 39, three of 19).

However, even in surgery patients who did not achieve remission, a significant improvement was still reported after 12 years, with a decreased mean in the amount of antidiabetic medications compared to both nonsurgery group 1 (-0.3± versus 0.8, P=0.002) and nonsurgery group 2 (-0.3 versus 1.1, P<0.001).

Several cardiovascular-related benefits were also reported after 12 years among the surgery group, with significant remission rates reported for HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to both nonsurgical groups. Long term hypertension benefit was also reported following surgical intervention, although rate of remission was only significant when compared to the first nonsurgical group (adjusted OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.7-15.6, P<0.001).

In a statement to MedPage Today, Paul Thodiyil, MD, director of the Bariatric Surgery Program at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, called this study “important,” and praised the long-term follow-up to assess the benefits of bariatric surgery, and specifically, the gastric bypass procedure.

“While, sadly, it confirms an increased incidence of suicides in those undergoing weight loss surgery [five in the surgery group; two in nonsurgery group 1], the overall gains are substantial,” said Thodiyil, referring to the significant weight loss and diabetes benefits sustained long term. He was not involved with the study,

 Adams said that his group hopes to continue to follow both the surgical and nonsurgical participant cohorts into the future

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