Charitable help provides a gastric bypass and life-saving Kidney Transplant.

Charitable help provides a gastric bypass and life-saving Kidney Transplant

(BPT) – Elaine could be described as a woman with great determination and patience. She experienced kidney failure seven years ago and faced the reality of life with a chronic illness. She began receiving dialysis, a four-hour treatment three times a week, and anxiously awaited news of a kidney match. This miracle call happened earlier this year and Elaine was successfully transplanted on March 22, 2017.

Elaine’s journey to receive a kidney transplant gradually unfolded thanks to her determination and the support of many people. She received care from her family and loved ones, who looked after her and shuttled her to and from many dialysis visits.

She underwent gastric bypass surgery

The surgery worked well as she worked closely with a dietitian to help her hit the target weight loss necessary to be eligible for transplant. She was a fortunate recipient of a donated kidney. Lastly, for seven years Elaine received financial support from a charity to afford her insurance premiums.

This financial support, known as charitable assistance, is a vital safety net that Elaine and approximately 15 percent of all dialysis patients need to maintain coverage. Due to the significant amount of time required of dialysis, many people with kidney failure are unable to continue working. Many patients rely on charitable assistance to help cover insurance premiums and other health-related expenses. For patients like Elaine, charitable assistance helps ensure continuous care and allows them to choose the insurance coverage they think is best for them at this most critical time. Without it, many patients may lose their private insurance coverage and with it, a number of other benefits, including access to the specialists they need to see.

Recently, a number of insurance companies have waged an attack against charitable assistance. In fact, thousands of patients have been pushed out of their health insurance plans, facing the horrible reality of having their coverage taken away when they need it most.

Access to insurance, quality care and continuity of coverage for everyone, especially those with severe health issues, must be protected. If not, one group consistently loses: patients. Patients like Elaine.

For more success to stories like Elaine’s, there is an equal and significant need for transplant donors — living or deceased. There are 97,000 people on the kidney transplant waiting list and the average wait time for a kidney donor match is three and a half years. Nineteen thousand people received a kidney transplant in 2016; however, that still leaves many more people on the list, waiting to receive the phone call that they have been successfully matched with a donor.

As the health care conversation continues in this country, there should be honest discussions about how patients access high-quality care, are able to visit the doctors and specialists they need, and are allowed to choose the insurance option that best meets their needs. Most importantly, patients in financial need should be able to get assistance, with appropriate guardrails, to help afford the costs.

To learn more, visit DaVita.com/Transplant.

Read more…

For Free Information about Gastric Bypass Surgery in France Click Here

Gastric Bypass surgery prices

Compare Lowest Price Gastric bypass Surgery Abroad

cheapest gastric bypass

 

The 5 Reasons Why Your Abs Aren’t Showing

Compare cost of Weight Loss Surgery in France

cost of gastric band surgery uk

The 5 Reasons Why Your Abs Aren’t Showing

Struggling with belly fat? Do you spend hours in the gym but your abs still aren’t showing? If so, tweak your diet and exercise routine! Common mistakes, such as over-training, sleeping too little, and skimping on protein, can stall your progress.

Remember that abs are made in the kitchen. Not even the best workout plan can compensate for bad eating. Ideally, your diet should be high in protein and low in carbs. Stress, chromosomal imbalances, and excessive cardio only make things worse.

Building a six pack takes hard work and commitment. There are no shortcuts or miracle pills to help you out. Crash diets slow down your metabolism, causing your body to store fat. Overtraining increases the stress hormone cortisol levels, which in turns, leads to weight gain. If these things worked, you’d already have six pack abs.

Here’s where you might be going wrong and how to fix it:

Eating the Wrong Foods

No matter how hard you work out, training alone won’t give you ripped abs. When it comes it comes to building a six pack, exercise and diet are equally important. Your abs won’t show unless you have a low body fat percentage. That’s about 10 percent body fat for men and 14 percent for women. To shed fat, clean eating is a must.

Sugary treats, junk food, processed meats, refined oils, and soft drinks have no place in a “clean” diet. Your daily meals must consist of real food.

Load up on protein, ditch the sugar, and get your fats from whole foods, such as tuna, salmon, and avocado. Coconut oil is rich in MCTs (medium chain triglycerides), which rev up your metabolism and burn belly fat. Lean meat, fish, eggs, and low-fat dairy are excellent sources of protein. Your carbs should come from green vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and seeds.

For best results, remove gluten and dairy from your diet. Both gluten and lactose, the sugar in milk, trigger inflammation and promote fat storage. For instance, lactose stimulates insulin release, leading to weight gain. According to study, milk increases insulin levels to the same extent as white bread.

Doing Too Much Cardio

Now let’s focus on training. Most gym goers engage in long cardio sessions to get ripped abs. This is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Too much cardio can mess up your hormones and put stress on your joints.

When you’re spending long hours on the treadmill, your cortisol levels go up. At the same time, testosterone production drops. This leads to weight gain, fatigue, muscle loss, mood swings, and hunger pangs. Excessive cardiovascular training burns both muscle and fat. On top of that, your body adapts to exercise and reduces its energy expenditure.

If you want shredded abs, HIIT the gym hard! Minute per minute, high-intensity interval training is better than cardio for fat loss. It not only torches fat but also boosts your metabolism and improves insulin sensitivity. In the long run, it enhances athletic performance. Unlike steady state cardio, it doesn’t affect lean mass.

Trying to Spot Reduce

Like it or not, you can not lose fat from specific areas of the body. No matter how many sit-ups you do, your abs won’t show unless you eat clean and lift heavy. The only way to build a six pack is to slowly burn fat from your entire body. This can be done through diet, high intensity training, and heavy lifting.

Most times, belly fat is the last bit to come off. Unless you’re genetically gifted with a fast metabolism, it can take weeks or even month to make your abs pop. The key is consistency.

Abdominal exercises will strengthen your core but have little effect on body fat levels. Compound movements, such as the deadlift, push-ups, squats, and chin-ups, increase metabolism and improve body composition. Three sets of heavy squats will do more for your abs than hundreds of crunches.

Relying on Gym Machines

Gym machines can add variety to your workout and help maintain good lifting form. However, they are not a substitute for dumbbells, barbells, and other free weights. For instances, weighted crunches are far more effective than the ab crunch machine.

When you’re using free weights, your body works hard to maintain its balance. This helps develop core strength, improves your posture, and boosts muscular endurance.

Free weights challenge your muscles into growth and make you stronger overall. They also help you burn more calories, leading to fat loss. The squat, chest press, military press, and other exercises that require free weights force your core to stabilize. This helps increase ab definition and enhances your balance. Eventually, you can use gym machines for the last set when your muscles are fatigued.

Let’s say you do three sets of weighted crunches. At this point, your abs should be on fire. Perform an extra set on the cable crunch machine to reach muscle failure. Use this strategy for all muscle groups, not just your abs.

Working Your Abs Every Day

It’s not unusual to see gym goers doing ab work every single day. Your abdominals are just like any other muscle. If you’re overtraining them, they will adapt and stop growing. In the worst case scenario, you’ll end up losing muscle.

Work your abs once every three days or so. Give your body time to recover. Focus on compound exercises, such as barbell squat and pull-ups, on the days when you’re training abs. These movements engage your core muscles and burn fat.

Now that you know what it takes to make your abs pop, adjust your diet and training routine. Make sure you check out The Six Pack in 60 Days guide, which provides the exact steps needed to get ripped abs. It also highlights the most common ab training mistakes and how to fix them.

The guide includes a complete clean eating plan that shows you what to eat and how to plan your meals like a pro. It’s the ultimate resource for those who are tired of wasting time in the gym with little or no results. Give it a try – your future self will thank you!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9766926

Read more…

For free information about weight loss surgery in France Click here

South Africa’s obsession with food and the psychology of weight loss

Compare price of gastric bypass in France

Obesity is a growing concern in South Africa, particularly because of the lifestyle diseases associated with it, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. Gastric bypass surgery is an increasingly popular treatment option for appropriate patients, however surgery alone cannot address the unhealthy relationship with food that frequently leads to obesity.
“Often people reward or comfort themselves with food, which is eating for psychological rather than nutritional reasons, and, over time, this can become deeply ingrained and may lead to obesity, ” explains Charlene McIntosh, one of the psychologists in the multidisciplinary team supporting gastric bypass patients of general surgeon, Dr Gert du Toit, and his surgical partner Dr Ivor Funnell, who head up the bariatric surgery and weight loss procedures centre at Netcare St Augustine’s Hospital.
“Another aspect that appears to be driving obesity is the central role of food in South African culture, by which I mean that many of our social interactions tend to revolve around eating, ” she explains.
“We often meet friends and family for a meal, tea and cake, shisinyama or a braai. For people who are grappling with their weight, this can make it even harder for them to exercise self-control, particularly if they feel social pressure to eat, ” says McIntosh.
Du Toit, who specialises in complex digestive laparoscopic procedures, says that gastric bypass surgery is not to be undertaken lightly and is not appropriate for all patients with obesity and related conditions.
“We are committed to helping patients achieve positive health outcomes, and there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that conditions such as type 2 diabetes and hypertension can be well controlled, if not fully alleviated, with gastric bypass surgery and behavioural change, ” Dr Du Toit notes.
In line with the protocols of the South African Society for Surgery, Obesity and metabolism (SASSO), prospective patients must be assessed for suitability and supported through the surgery and afterwards by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals.
“Patients must be dedicated and committed to making a lifelong change, otherwise the surgical intervention will be far less likely to help the individual achieve better health over the long term. For this reason, it is sometimes advisable for patients to prepare for a few additional months to make absolutely certain that they are ready for the significant lifestyle changes to ensure that they get the best out of the treatment, ” explains Dr Du Toit.
Du Toit likens the preparation for gastric bypass surgery to that of climbing a mountain. “If you consider people who climb Mount Everest, it is the ones who never look back who are most likely to make it to the summit. Our team needs to ensure that the surgical candidates have a similar mindset and commitment before the gastric bypass is performed.”
A vital aspect of preparation for the surgery is dealing with the emotional aspects, as McIntosh explains: “The role of the psychologist is to identify and address underlying emotional trauma that may be at the root of some people’s compulsion to eat. This is a vital aspect of the holistic treatment for patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery, because the operation can change the body but the person’s mindset also needs to change to achieve lasting outcomes.”
“We emphasise that there is a distinction between eating because you are hungry and eating for psychological or social reasons. People need to redefine their relationship with food, and in the case of obese patients we essentially have to teach them to eat again.”
Addressing the social pressures around eating often requires the individual’s support base, including family and friends, to develop greater awareness. “Instead of organising time together around food, as in ‘let’s meet for lunch’, it is a good idea to sensitise the person’s social circle to rather meet for a walk or other activities that do not centre around eating, ” she advises.
This is one of the messages conveyed in the monthly meeting of the support group for people who have either had or are considering the definition of morbid obesity in relation to the benefits of gastric bypass surgery, hosted by dietitian Mandy Read, who is also part of the multidisciplinary team at the bariatric surgery centre. The meetings are also open to the family and friends supporting patients through their journey.
“A key aspect of changing people’s emotional reliance on food is replacing comfort eating or reward eating with another pleasurable activity, such as going for a massage, or weight loss hypnosis, or having a relaxing bubble bath or learning to play a musical instrument. Interestingly, we have found that people who replace emotional eating with a creative outlet, such as painting, photography, music or gardening, tend to have better outcomes in general, ” McIntosh observes.
“Perhaps the most important factor is for the person to realise that they can shape their future and have real belief that their lives can be different. If a person has been morbidly obese for many years, sadly they often become used to sitting at home and feeling isolated, and cannot imagine a life beyond that.”
“Imagine clothes shopping, and being so limited in your choice because you are trying to find something that is large enough to fit you, rather than shopping for clothing that makes you look and feel good. We try to help people realise that there is a life beyond the effects of obesity and help them to get to the stage where they can get full enjoyment out of life without an overreliance on food, ” she adds.
According to McIntosh people who have lost a lot of weight may have some difficulty reconciling the changes in their bodies with the way they see themselves. “Some patients have managed to get down to a healthy weight but will still turn sideways to go through doors as they had to when they were morbidly obese. Often there is a process of re-building a person’s self-esteem so that they can make the best of the physical transformation they have achieved, ” she concludes.
(adapted from the following press release)

© Independent Media and affiliated companies. All rights reservedAdvertise with usFeedbackPrivacy PolicyTerms & Conditions

For FREE No Obligation Information about weight loss surgery information and Gastric Bypass Surgery Click Here

Weight Loss Surgery in France

Wendy Williams brags weight loss, plastic surgery boob job after beach body diss

Compare cost of Adjustable Gastric band Surgery In Europe

cost of gastric band surgery uk

Poor #Wendy Williams can’t win for losing. She’s still dealing with shade over her bikini body. The radio host shared pictures of herself in a string bikini on Instagram and that set off a barrage of body-shaming toward her “transgender” look, boob job, saggy skin and plastic surgery. The celebrity shut down the Twitter diss storm saying she’s “got in goin’ on” with a tight tummy after weight loss. But all followfolks saw was a beach body fail.

Wendy Williams dissed on breast implant, skinny body

After a boasted 50-lb weight loss not long ago, Wendy Williams braved to beach to show off her slimmed down bikini body. But since the TV celebrity has had had extensive breast implant procedures, the effect is top-heavy.

That’s putting it mildly according to many social media commenters. One said “The Wendy Williams Show” host looked like an improper fraction. Others were horrified by saggy skin and cellulite. At first Williams laughed it off saying that as a celebrity commenter herself she couldn’t live in a glass house.

Wendy Williams called transgender in bikini pic

Comparisons were made to Michael Jackson. Another Twitter user saw Roger from American Dad in one of his female impersonator disguises. Reality TV [VIDEO] star Mama June Shannon can be thankful that Honey Boo Boo and Pumpkin talked her out of the size F boob job. Shannon posed in the Baywatch suit both in obesity and after bariatric surgery and weight loss. But June says she’ll never wear a bikini due to tummy tuck, skin removal and gastric bypass surgery scars

Wendy Show host loves her “tight” body

The talk show host had to start her new season off talking down bikini body dissing. Much of the body-shaming focused on the loose skin. Folks said Williams needed some skin removal surgery herself. Wendy says her skin is taut and the tummy is tight and free of belly fat. She claims that it’s from weight loss but most folks said it looked more like a tummy tuck taken to extremes. Her boob job and nose job, implants, and facelift stood out like sore thumbs.

What’s body-shaming and what’s truth-saying?

Usually when there’s online body-trolling, it’s of the fat-shaming kind. Oprah Winfrey has dealt with this for some time, but seems to have mastered her obesity without weight loss surgery. And folks have thin-shamed too.

This often involves very slender #Celebrities being “accused” of having an eating disorder (like it’s a fault and something to be ashamed of). Sometimes it turns out to be anorexia, but often, as with Sarah Hyland, it’s a health condition. The big issue seems to be the boob job. When done with a tummy tuck it can make weight loss appear greater. In Wendy Williams’ case, it seems to have been exaggerated, howeve

See all stories on this topic

Read more…

For more Information on Weight Loss surgery in France Click here

Rosemary loses 98 lbs after gastric sleeve surgery

 

 

#gastricbandfrance #gastricbands
Find us on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/gastricbandsurgery/
Find us on Twitter at:-https://twitter.com/gastricbands
Find us on YouTube at :- https://youtu.be/DyBOnaR6E80
or simply call us on 0033 686567031

 

Weight Loss Surgeries May Make You Anemic Later in Life: Study

Compare cost of Weight Loss Surgery In Europe

compare best price gastric band surgery

Weight Loss Surgeries May Make You Anemic Later in Life:

An American based study indicates that the risk of long-term loss of healthy red blood cells, otherwise known as anemia, may be associated with weight loss surgeries.

Have you been considering a weight reduction surgery? Here’s a piece of information that you might be interested in. An American based study indicates that the risk of long-term loss of healthy red blood cells, otherwise known as anemia, may be associated with weight loss surgeries.

In the study, published in the journal JAMA Surgery, people who got a common form of weight-loss (bariatric) surgery, faced symptoms of anemia later. Anemia rates were found to be on a higher side 10 years after the surgery, noted the researchers.

Scientists who reviewed the study explained that anemia is a common problem in patients who have undergone gastric bypass, and the severity of problem may increase in patients who don’t receive adequate treatment, adding to certain side effects of the surgery such as vitamin and mineral deficiency. For the study, the team tracked outcomes for 74 older male veterans, with the average age of 51, who underwent a common type of weight-loss surgery called Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The findings revealed that the overall rate of anemia before the surgery was 20 percent. The team further noted that 10 years after surgery that number had risen to 47 percent. The study also finds that anemia was much more common among patients who did not have close follow-up care with a weight-loss surgeon. For such patients, who discontinued their follow up care, anemia rates rose from 22 percent before surgery to 57 percent a decade later.

The scientists noted that while bariatric surgery may help curb obesity, but patients should not believe that they are cured and must continue to follow medical direction for the duration of their life.

Obesity is a disorder involving excessive body fat that increases the risk of health problems. Obesity is often tied to health problems such as heart disease and diabetes. Here are some suggestions to control excess weight gain.

1.Eat more whole grains: Whole grains provide energy and are also full of essential nutrients. Stock up on whole grains like Bajra, Ragi, Maize and Jowar and use them often. Try red, black and brown rice instead of refined white rice.

2.Keep trans fats away: Industrial trans fats may be present in fast foods, snack foods, cookies, margarine and spreads. Read the labels and find better substitutes.

3.Do not skip meals: Yes, as counter-intutive as it may sound, but it is essential to keep your diet in place to maintain healthy weight. Eat three balanced meals. Take a standard dinner plate, fill with vegetables, 1/3rd with cereal, 1/3rd with the protein and add 150 ml of milk or dahi.

4. Apples can help: Apples contain pectin, a type of fiber that keeps you feeling fuller for longer. Apples can be great mid-meal snacks.

5. Load up on strawberries: Strawberries are extremely low in calories and pack heaps of antioxidants and Vitamin C. An entire cup of strawberries barely contains 50 calories!

These simple diet tweaks will not only help you lose weight but also maintain it

Read more…

For More Information About Weight Loss Surgery Click Here

Gastric Band Surgery France

Bariatric surgery could help solve Ireland’s obesity crisis and save the country billions

Weight Loss surgery could help solve Ireland’s obesity crisis and save the country billions

A group of doctors say that, for many people, prevention methods are already too late and other interventions are needed.

lowest price for gastric sleeve surgery in FranceBLifestyle factors only get you so far. To prevent the children who are obese today from becoming adults who are obese in the next 10 years, you have to offer treatment. It’s the only way.

ACCORDING TO THE latest estimates, only one in every 10 Irish men will not be overweight or obese by 2030.

By 2025, we’re set to be one of the most overweight nations in Europe. Already, six in every 10 people in Ireland are overweight.

The HSE says that the cost of adult obesity in Ireland is estimated to be €1.3 billion per annum, €400 million of which is direct healthcare costs. That figure could rise even further in the future, as the population’s weight increases.

While a number of prevention strategies are essential, some doctors say that for people who are already obese, it is already too late.

As a result, a disparate group of health organisations, including Diabetes Ireland, the Irish Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism and Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute, are calling on the government and HSE to introduce a variety of health interventions for overweight or obese people, with surgery one of the main options put forth.

They say that, from a public health and economic point of view, their case is compelling.

“No way of avoiding it”

Dr Grace O’Malley lectures at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and also works at Temple Street Children’s University Hospital.

She told TheJournal.ie that there is a cost-effectiveness in providing surgery for obese people, particularly those with type-2 diabetes, that hasn’t yet been fully explored in Ireland.

O’Malley said that a coordinated approach of GP care, dietitians, chartered physios and clinical psychologists could all play a role, as could surgical interventions.

“The idea of willpower and individual responsibility works to a point, ” she said. “When a disease like obesity has ingrained itself in the body to an extreme level, reversing it through lifestyle approaches becomes harder and harder.

Look to the evidence, currently it suggests that bariatric procedures are effective at reducing morbidity and reducing mortality. It’s actually saving money in the long run because you’re not spending on medication.

So what is bariatric surgery? It can take several different forms. The gold standard surgery comes in two forms – a gastric bypass or gastresctomy – and both are minimally invasive. Within a year of treatment,  a patient’s excess body weight can be cut in half.

Helen Heneghan, bariatric surgeon at St Vincent’s Hospital and St Columcille’s Hospital in Dublin, told TheJournal.ie that the results for obese patients with type-2 diabetes can be drastic.

She said: “Within 24 hours of a gastric bypass for example, we routinely see patients achieve normal blood sugars by the following morning. At least 80% of patients can achieve that a year after surgery. We know five years after that a patient may need medication, but they don’t go back on insulin.

There’s a strong health and economic argument. If you can reduce the cost of treating a type-2 diabetic overnight, it’s quite clear what we need to do.

Huge savings

Up to now, these surgeries have been performed rarely in Ireland. We do just one of these surgeries per 100, 000 population here. It’s 20 times that in the UK. It’s around 80 times that in Sweden.

These doctors, in citing evidence to support their case, mainly draw on international examples but also say that research on the surgeries performed last year in Ireland support their case too.

Taking 15 patients, with hard-to-treat type-2 diabetes, who received bariatric surgery in 2016, a comparison was made between how much they spent on insulin before and how they spent after.

O’Malley said: “Beforehand, they were spending an estimated €8 per day for insulin. After the surgery they were, on average, spending 23 cent a day. And that’s an immediate reduction of 97%. That’s a huge amount.”

Both O’Malley and Heneghan said they wished they could provide more data but, despite hundreds of people on waiting lists, the number of bariatric procedures performed last year was extremely low.

Heneghan said that only being able to provide data from 15 patients was “dismal” while O’Malley said “it’s a shame but that’s all we’ve done”.

Heneghan went on: “No drug treatment can put diabetes into remission like that. It’s a chronic, relentless disease that often leads to damaging, and quite costly, complications.

Things like cardiovascular disease, stroke. It’s hugely costly to our health service.

Weight Loss Surgery Funding

The main barrier to more surgeries being done in Ireland at the moment is funding.

The HSE launched a 10-year plan last year to fight obesity in Ireland, and recently appointed the first national clinical lead in this area,  Professor Donal O’Shea.

“But the new clinical lead is going to need support, ” O’Malley said. “This condition has only really developed over the last 20 years. Financial support is needed to do what needs to be done.”

According to estimates based on figures from the World Health Organisation, the World Bank and an in-depth study of when the surgeries began to be routinely performed in Australia, it would cost about €400 million of investment into providing these surgeries on a wider level nationwide.

“There’s a lot of evidence to show investment will make a difference, ” O’Malley said.

Medication savings alone are a really good argument. And that’s not counting the savings from people not requiring treatment for obesity-related conditions. We’ve kicked our heels for too long. For a lot of people, it may already too late.

How many would benefit from bariatric Surgery?

According to figures provided by Diabetes Ireland, there are around 26, 000 people in the country with type-2 diabetes who are obese.

“The vast majority of these people would benefit from surgery in the near future, ” Heneghan said.

“We want to get to a point of 100 cases a year, ” she said. “But we could easily justify 400 cases a year in Ireland.”

Only two publicly-funded hospitals offer such surgeries – in Galway and Dublin – but of the relatively small number of people on the waiting list, some have been waiting a long time for treatment.

“There around 400 people on waiting lists for bariatric surgery in the country right now, ” Heneghan said. “And some of those would have been waiting for five or six years.”

“They Did it to themselves?”

If the most cost-effective treatment solution is so apparent, then why don’t we offer it routinely in Ireland?

According to the doctors, there are a number of reasons for this and it is partly related to the way society views people with obesity.

Routinely, according to scientific literature cited by the doctors, people who are overweight are told to simply change lifestyle factors and there may be a perception that they “did it to themselves”.

Not so, according to O’Malley. She said: “There are ingrained judgemental attitudes and negative stigma towards people of larger size.

For those of us working in the area, anyone who’s honest would say that when they began working in this field, they’d be quite judgemental too.

She said that it is important to treat obesity as a disease, and approach treatment options to it as such.

“Obesity is now linked with deprivation, ” O’Malley said. “Where there is lower socio-economic status, children are twice as likely to be obese. That can’t be ignored.

If we were talking about the management of cancer, or other chronic disease, thankfully we’ve got to a stage where depending on the stage of that cancer, we have different treatments to offer that person. We don’t – and shouldn’t – withhold treatment based on their disease.

Heneghan added that, for these surgical interventions to be the most effective, action must be taken now.

“There may be tens of thousands who could benefit, ” she said. “We know that if you delay surgery, not only do the costs of treating patients medically accumulate, the likely benefit of the surgery reduced.”

For its part, the HSE said it is committed to following through on its 10-year action plan.

Taking his new role as the HSE’s clinical lead in obesity, Professor O’Shea cited lifestyle factors as important but said that there was “no magic bullet” to fixing the problems.

He said: “Somehow we have to get this whole of government, whole of industry and whole of society approach to come alive – and take obesity on.”

Heneghan added that, with current trends only going upwards in terms of the number of people in Ireland who are overweight or obese, the time to act is now:

We have a window of opportunity over the next few years. We need to seize it before it’s too late. y Sean Murray Thursday 5 Oct 2017, 12:15 AM Oct 5th 2017

For FREE NO OBLIGATION about weight loss surgery in France CLICK HERE

Gastric Band Surgery France

 

 

‘I feel alive now!’ Star from Karl Stefanovic’s This Time Next Year showcases jaw-dropping 102kg …

TTNY star showcases 102kg weight loss on Weekend Today

Karl Stefanovic talks to 9Honey about new show This Time Next Year

Karl Stefanovic: ‘When you’re going through a struggle, it does feel like you’re alone’

Karl Stefanovic slams Christopher Pyne Karl Stefanovic storms out of studio on air over origin Karl Stefanovic dodges media spotlight Karl Stefanovic calls “BS” on gay marriage Lisa Wilkinson grilled over pay gap Karl Stefanovic attacks Peter Dutton Karl Stefanovic reacts The Block: Lowest score ever. 12-year-old boy transitions to female then changes mind 1st Aug 2017 9:09 AM

Compare Price of Gastric Band Surgery in France