, End Obesity Management Market Worldwide by Surgery, Prescription Weight-Loss Medication

Prescription Medications to Treat Over-weight and Obesity for people from Ashburn

weight loss surgery france HandbookHow do you define:- “over weight” and “obesity”?

Health care providers use the Body Mass Index (BMI), which is a measure of your weight in relation to your height, to define overweight and obesity. People who have a BMI between 25 and 30 are considered overweight. Obesity is defined as having a BMI of 30 or greater. You can calculate your BMI to learn if you are overweight or obese. Being overweight or obese may increase the risk of health problems. Your health care provider can assess your individual risk due to your weight.

Obesity is a chronic condition that affects more than one in three adults in the United States. Another one in three adults is overweight. If you are struggling with your weight, you may find that a healthy eating plan and regular physical activity help you lose weight and keep it off over the long term. If these lifestyle changes are not enough to help you lose weight or maintain your weight loss, your doctor may prescribe medications as part of your weight-control program.

How do weight-loss medications work?

Prescription medications to treat overweight and obesity work in different ways. For example, some medications may help you feel less hungry or full sooner. Other medications may make it harder for your body to absorb fat from the foods you eat.

Who might benefit from weight-loss medications?

Weight-loss medications are meant to help people who may have health problems related to overweight or obesity. Before prescribing a weight-loss medication, your doctor also will consider

the likely benefits of weight loss the medication’s possible side effects your current health issues and other medications your family’s medical history cost

Health care professionals often use BMI to help decide who might benefit from weight-loss medications. Your doctor may prescribe a medication to treat your overweight or obesity if you are an adult with

a BMI of 30 or more or a BMI of 27 or more and you have weight-related health problems, such as high blood pressure or type 2 diabetes.

Weight-loss medications aren’t for everyone with a high BMI. Some people who are overweight or obese may lose weight with a lifestyle program that helps them change their behaviors and improve their eating and physical activity habits. A lifestyle program may also address other factors that affect weight gain, such as eating triggers and not getting enough sleep.

Can children or teenagers take weight-loss medications?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved most weight-loss medications only for adults. The prescription medication orlistat (Xenical) is FDA-approved for children ages 12 and older.

Can medications replace physical activity and healthy eating habits as a way to lose weight?

Medications don’t replace physical activity or healthy eating habits as a way to lose weight. Studies show that weight-loss medications work best when combined with a lifestyle program. Ask your doctor or other health care professional about lifestyle treatment programs for weight management that will work for you.

Weight-loss medications don’t replace physical activity and healthy eating habits.

What are the benefits of using prescription medications to lose weight?

When combined with changes to behavior, including eating and physical activity habits, prescription medications may help some people lose weight. On average, people who take prescription medications as part of a lifestyle program lose between 3 and 9 percent more of their starting body weight than people in a lifestyle program who do not take medication. Research shows that some people taking prescription weight-loss medications lose 10 percent or more of their starting weight.1 Results vary by medication and by person.

Weight loss of 5 to 10 percent of your starting body weight may help improve your health by lowering blood sugar, blood pressure, and triglycerides. Losing weight also can improve some other health problems related to overweight and obesity, such as joint pain or sleep apnea. Most weight loss takes place within the first 6 months of starting the medication.

 

What are the concerns with using prescription medications to lose weight?

Experts are concerned that, in some cases, the side effects of prescription medications to treat overweight and obesity may outweigh the benefits. For this reason, you should never take a weight-loss medication only to improve the way you look. In the past, some weight-loss medications were linked to serious health problems. For example, the FDA recalled fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine (part of the “fen-phen” combination) in 1997 because of concerns related to heart valve problems.

Possible side effects vary by medication and how it acts on your body. Most side effects are mild and most often improve if you continue to take the medication. Rarely, serious side effects can occur.

 

Which weight-loss medication might work for me?

Choosing a medication to treat overweight or obesity is a decision between you and your doctor. Important factors to consider include

the likely benefits of weight loss the medication’s possible side effects your current health issues and other medications your family’s medical history cost Talk with your doctor about which weight-loss medication might be right for you.

 

 

What medications are available to treat overweight and obesity?

The table below lists FDA-approved prescription medications for weight loss. The FDA has approved five of these drugs—orlistat (Xenical, Alli), lorcaserin (Belviq), phentermine-topiramate (Qsymia), naltrexone-bupropion (Contrave), and liraglutide (Saxenda)—for long-term use. You can keep taking these drugs as long as you are benefiting from treatment and not having unpleasant side-effects.

Some weight-loss medications that curb appetite are approved by the FDA only for short-term use, or up to 12 weeks. Although some doctors prescribe them for longer periods of time, not many research studies have looked at how safe and effective they are for long-term use.

Pregnant women should never take weight-loss medications. Women who are planning to get pregnant also should avoid these medications, as some of them may harm a fetus.

Prescription Medications Approved for Overweight and Obesity Treatment

Weight-loss medication Approved for How it works Common side effects Warnings Orlistat (Xenical)

Available in lower dose without prescription (Alli) Adults and children ages 12 and older Works in your gut to reduce the amount of fat your body absorbs from the food you eat diarrhea gas leakage of oily stools stomach pain Rare cases of severe liver injury have been reported. Avoid taking with cyclosporine. Take a multivitamin pill daily to make sure you get enough of certain vitamins that your body may not absorb from the food you eat. Lorcaserin (Belviq) Adults Acts on the serotonin receptors in your brain. May help you feel full after eating smaller amounts of food. constipation cough dizziness dry mouth feeling tired headaches nausea Tell your doctor if you take antidepressants or migraine medications, since some of these can cause problems when taken together. Phentermine-topiramate (Qsymia) Adults A mix of two medications: phentermine, which lessens your appetite, and topiramate, which is used to treat seizures or migraine headaches. May make you less hungry or feel full sooner. constipation dizziness dry mouth taste changes, especially with carbonated beverages tingling of your hands and feet trouble sleeping Don’t use if you have glaucoma or hyperthyroidism. Tell your doctor if you have had a heart attack or stroke, abnormal heart rhythm, kidney disease, or mood problems.

MAY LEAD TO BIRTH DEFECTS. DO NOT TAKE QSYMIA IF YOU ARE PREGNANT OR PLANNING A PREGNANCY. Do not take if you are breastfeeding. Naltrexone-bupropion (Contrave) Adults A mix of two medications: naltrexone, which is used to treat alcohol and drug dependence, and bupropion, which is used to treat depression or help people quit smoking. May make you feel less hungry or full sooner. constipation diarrhea dizziness dry mouth headache increased blood pressure increased heart rate insomnia liver damage nausea vomiting Do not use if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure, seizures or a history of anorexia or bulimia nervosa. Do not use if you are dependent on opioid pain medications or withdrawing from drugs or alcohol. Do not use if you are taking bupropion (Wellbutrin, Zyban).

How do doctors use prescription medications “off-label” to treat overweight and obesity?

Sometimes doctors use medications in a way that’s different from what the FDA has approved, known as “off-label” use. By choosing an off-label medication to treat overweight and obesity, your doctor may prescribe

a drug approved for treating a different medical problem two or more drugs at the same time a drug for a longer period of time than approved by the FDA

You should feel comfortable asking your doctor if he or she is prescribing a medication that is not approved just for treating overweight and obesity. Before using a medication, learn all you need to know about it.

What other medications for weight loss may be available in the future?

Researchers are currently studying several new medications and combinations of medications in animals and people. Researchers are working to identify safer and more effective medications to help people who are overweight or obese lose weight and maintain a healthy weight for a long time.

Future drugs may use new strategies, such as to

combine drugs that affect appetite and those that affect addiction (or craving) stimulate gut hormones that reduce appetite shrink the blood vessels that feed fat cells in the body, thereby preventing them from growing target genes that affect body weight change bacteria in the gut to control weight

References

[1] Yanovski SZ, Yanovski JA. JAMA. Long-term drug treatment for obesity: A systematic and clinical review. 2014; 311(1):74–86.

July 2016 Share

Additional Information sources

This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. The NIDDK translates and disseminates research findings through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, health professionals, and the public. Content produced by the NIDDK is carefully reviewed by NIDDK scientists and other experts.

The NIDDK would like to thank:
Kishore Gadde, M.D., Pennington Biomedical Research Center

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Health Information Center

 

 

About NIDDK

Phone: +1-800-860-8747
TTY: +1-866-569-1162

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Healthy Living – Four Tips For Maintaining A Healthy Body Weight

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Healthy Living – Four Tips For Maintaining A Healthy Body Weight

get gastric sleeve surgeryLooking to maintain a healthy body weight in Ashburn?

Looking to maintain a healthy body weight? Whether you have been dieting in the last little while and have finally reached your goal weight or you simply are looking to ensure you do not gain weight going forward, there are a few tips that can assist in ensuring you stay on track.

Let us look at four different strategies you can use to keep your weight in check. Four strategies not requiring intricate calorie counting…

1. Add More Protein. If you hate counting calories but want to do your best to prevent weight gain, consider adding more protein to your diet plan. Protein is the nutrient tending to be the most satisfying, so is what you are least likely to overeat.

As a result, you will feel more satisfied after every meal. Thus your chances of eating more than you should go down. Aim to take in at least 15 grams of protein with each snack and 20 to 30 grams with each meal to achieve this effect.

2. Sip Water Throughout The Day. Dehydration can cause food cravings in many people, leading you to eat when you just needed to have a drink. To avoid this, sip water throughout the day. Carry a jug of water with you wherever you go and make a concentrated effort to drink it between meals.

It can help to get a gallon jug of water and fill it up once in the morning and then make sure by dinner time you have drunk it all. A gallon jug of water will provide a little extra over what you need but will be beneficial if you are also leading an active lifestyle.

3. Set Fitness Focused Goals. Do not fall into the trap of thinking once you have reached your body weight goal that is it. Set a new goal. Focus on something fitness related. Train for a 10km race or focus on adding 20 pounds to your squat or bench press exercise.

By having a new goal to work towards, you will help sustain better overall focus on your fitness plan, and this can lead to healthier eating efforts as well.

4. Allow For Indulgence. Finally, do not be too strict on yourself. Make sure you are allowing for overeating every so often. Remember your diet should make room for fun foods as well. Otherwise, it is not a diet you will want to be on for the long-term.

If you keep these tips in mind, you should have no problem sustaining a healthy body weight well into the months ahead.

Although managing Type 2 diabetes can be very challenging, it is not a condition you must just live with. Make simple changes to your daily routine – include exercise to help lower both your blood sugar levels and your weight.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9761472

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Weight-Loss Surgery: Durable in the Long-Term

Benefits of gastric bypass surgery

In a recent report about the long term benefits of gastric bypass surgery good results were still being seen 12 years post-operative, an observational study found.

People with severe obesity who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reported a sustained body weight reduction 12 years following surgery (-77.2 lbs from baseline, 95% CI -84.7 to -70.0, mean % change -26.9%), according to Ted D. Adams, PhD, MPH, of Intermountain Healthcare, and colleagues in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Previously reported 2-year and 6-year observational data from this cohort were published by the research group to assess the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent gastric bypass, and was later ” broadened to include the durability and long-term outcomes of gastric bypass compared to severely obese patients who did not undergo surgical intervention,” Adams told MedPage Today. “We hoped to see similar favorable outcomes at 12 years.”

With over a 90% follow-up rate at 12-years, the analysis included 1,156 severely obese patients — 418 of whom underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Comprising of two nonsurgical comparative groups, there were 417 patients who sought out surgery, but did not undergo surgery mainly due to insurance coverage (non-surgery group 1). ‘Nonsurgery group 2’ comprised of a total of 321 severely obese people, who did not seek out surgery. All nonsurgery participants were not provided with any study-based weight loss therapy, however, they were free to independently pursue such intervention. After 12 years, neither nonsurgery group achieved a significant mean change in weight loss:

  • Group 1: -6.4 lbs (-15.2 to -2.2, mean change -2.0%)
  • Group 2: -0.0 lbs (-7.7 to 7.7, mean change -0.9%)

Two years after gastric bypass, the surgery group reported a significant adjusted mean body weight change of -99.2 lbs from baseline (95 % CI -104.1 to 94.6 lb; mean percent change -35.0%). Similar benefits were also seen at 6 years out of surgery, with a sustained loss of -80.0 lbs mean body weight change from baseline (95% CI, -86.0 to -73.9 lb, mean percent change -28.0).

“The fact that the mean 12-year percent weight loss from baseline was very similar to that measured at 6 years follow-up was somewhat of a surprise,” Adams noted.

Weight loss wasn’t the only benefit sustained 12 years after surgery. Two years post-op, 75% of surgery patients with type 2 diabetes achieved remission (66 of 88), and 62% sustained 6-years post-op (54 of 87). At the 12-year follow-up, over half of patients who had type 2 diabetes at time of surgery remained in remission (43 of 84, 51%), with Adams calling this finding “encouraging.” The odds ratio for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 1 was 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.24), while the OR for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 2 was 0.09 (95% CI 0.03-0.29)(P<0.001 for both).

Rates of diabetes remission were largely predicted by therapies used at baseline. Surgery patients who were not receiving antidiabetic medications as baseline were more likely to achieve remission after surgery (73%, 95% CI 46-99, 16 of 22), while 56% of those who were receiving oral medications at baseline achieved post-op remission (95% CI 35-77, 24 of 43). Only 16% of patients receiving insulin with or without other oral agents at baseline achieved remission (95% CI -8 to 39, three of 19).

However, even in surgery patients who did not achieve remission, a significant improvement was still reported after 12 years, with a decreased mean in the amount of antidiabetic medications compared to both nonsurgery group 1 (-0.3± versus 0.8, P=0.002) and nonsurgery group 2 (-0.3 versus 1.1, P<0.001).

Several cardiovascular-related benefits were also reported after 12 years among the surgery group, with significant remission rates reported for HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to both nonsurgical groups. Long term hypertension benefit was also reported following surgical intervention, although rate of remission was only significant when compared to the first nonsurgical group (adjusted OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.7-15.6, P<0.001).

In a statement to MedPage Today, Paul Thodiyil, MD, director of the Bariatric Surgery Program at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, called this study “important,” and praised the long-term follow-up to assess the benefits of bariatric surgery, and specifically, the gastric bypass procedure.

“While, sadly, it confirms an increased incidence of suicides in those undergoing weight loss surgery [five in the surgery group; two in nonsurgery group 1], the overall gains are substantial,” said Thodiyil, referring to the significant weight loss and diabetes benefits sustained long term. He was not involved with the study,

 Adams said that his group hopes to continue to follow both the surgical and nonsurgical participant cohorts into the future

Vegan, paleo and ketogenic diet weight loss recipes with diet food swaps

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Vegan, paleo and ketogenic diet weight loss recipes with diet food swaps

I have lost 100 pounds using a variety of diet tips and tricks. I don’t follow a specific weight loss diet because there’s no one meal plan that hits everything I’m looking for. So I do like they say in the Al-Anon slogans, “take what you like and leave the rest.”

 The ‘how I lost 100 pounds’ diet

My eating strategies are culled from a variety of #weight loss programs. The #Ketogenic Diet, South Beach, hypertension DASH diet, paleo, Mediterranean Diet, Weight Watchers and more. Some of my favorite weight loss tricks are food swaps. Using the “eat this, not that” and “hungry girl” concepts, I create recipes that trade fatty, sugary, salty, junky ingredients for healthier, low-calorie ones.

I package them like Nutrisystem does, for ease of use.

Religious fasting

I also follow many of the dietary fasts and restrictions of other religions. I’m not a Muslim, but Islam‘s halal foods are typically healthier. So are Jewish fasts and kosher foods. I am Catholic and observe Lent, but I try to do it all year-long. Many celebrities are preaching diets that have been put together centuries ago by different religions. Even doctors recommend some fasting (I say even because I got very little help with weight loss from the medical community, aside from bariatric surgery or gastric bypass advice). So I’m not to het up over traditional medicine.

Vegan and diabetic diets

Arguably, vegan or at least vegetarian is how we should all be eating. Supergirl Gabrielle Union says she’s imitating the fittest women who are vegan.
I’m not diabetic but before I lost weight my glucose number was getting higher. I was tentatively diagnosed with pre-diabetes (aka insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome). So I try to avoid refined sugar as if I had Type 2 diabetes.

Superfood bowls

“Bowling” is not only a sport but a trendy eating style just now. It just means eating food in bowls, typically based on salad. Now I adore pasta and potato salads and cole slaw. But made the usual way, sloppy with mayo, sugar, etc., they are calorie-bombs. So I put together a to-die-for coleslaw recipe you could literally live on. It’s vegan, superfood-dense, protein-rich, diabetic, bad fat-free, ketogenic (high in good fatty acids) low sodium, gluten-free, sugarfree and a meal in itself. Oh, and it’s super cheap to make. And my diet recipe is pretty too! See the picture above! (Those aren’t bugs, lol, but seeds)

Superfood kale slaw bowl

chopped kale with stems removed

coarsely grated carrots

chopped green and purple cabbage

cubed salad cucumbers (much tastier than other cukes)

chopped zucchini

sliced grape tomatoes

cashews and/or walnuts and/or almonds

pumpkin seeds

milled flaxseed

chia seeds

unsweetened dried strawberries, cranberries or blueberries

dash liquid smoke

apple cider, acai or pomegranate vinegar

whole seed, Dijon or horseradish mustard

lemon juice and zest

100% juice, raw honey (omit if making vegan) or blue agave syrup (optional)

Chop, slice, toss ingredients, season to taste with vinegar, mustard juice or honey, and enjoy.

This kale slaw is sweet enough for me without any honey or juice. But you may like it sweeter. Go easy on the juice and dried fruit as they are full of sugar and will spike glucose levels. #Gluten Free

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Chrissy Metz is tired of questions about her body, weight-loss surgery

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Chrissy Metz is tired of questions about her body, weight loss surgery

“The question I wish people would stop asking me is, ‘Are you having weight loss surgery? Are you gonna be doing a gastric bypass? Are you?’ Um, what?” Chrissy Metz revealed on the Today show on Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. “Some people do feel like they’re my doctors and they have tried to diagnose me on the internet. So that’s…that’s weird. ‘Cause like, I’m good. I’m good, boo. But thanks! But I’m good.”

According to Us Weekly, the Emmy nominee previously opened up about her character Kate’s weight-loss journey on This Is Us, as she decided to undergo gastric bypass surgery in the NBC series’ first season. “It is a fast fix and it’s not always the right answer,” the former American Horror Story actress explained during her December 2016 appearance on The Ellen Show. “I think with the character, Kate, she wants a quick fix because it’s not about the food. Food is the symptom. We’ll get to see all the details.”

Metz, 36, also revealed last November that she is contractually obligated to shed some pounds. “In our contact, it did state that would be a part of it, to lose the weight in the trajectory of the character as she comes to find herself,” she told TVLine, adding that she doesn’t mind. “That was a win-win for me. Because it’s one thing to try to do it on your own. But as human beings, it’s an ego thing: We’re more likely to do something for someone else.”

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New research examines the impact of so-called crash diets, also known as very low-calorie diets, on heart function. The findings call for more careful cardiac monitoring in people trying to lose weight.

Obesity, diabetes combatting device safe for treatment

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A non-surgical and reversible device for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity is safe, effective and should be rolled out across the National Health Service (NHS), researchers say.

The device — Endobarrier — is a reversible treatment that provides people with an alternative to drastic gastric bypass surgery.

It prevents food from coming into contact with the first part of the small intestine, but without painful invasive surgery.

Endobarrier consists of a 60-cm-long tube-like liner or sleeve that coats the inside of the small intestine, allowing food to pass through but not to be absorbed, which can be removed after a year.

The procedure aims to kick start a change in lifestyle and help people achieve better health, improve diabetes control as well as promote weight loss, the researchers said.

The Endobarrier therapy could be “highly effective in patients with obesity and diabetes that has been very hard to treat, with high patient satisfaction levels, and an acceptable safety profile”, said Robert Ryder and colleagues from City Hospital, Birmingham

“The Endobarrier service could be a safe and cost-effective treatment for the NHS — it does not involve surgery and patients do not have to stay in hospital (so reducing the risk of infection),” Ryder added.

For the study, presented at 2017 European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Portugal, the team investigated whether this new therapy could be translated into major clinical success by creating a small NHS Endobarrier service for people having difficulties managing their Type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Participants reported considerable improvements in wellbeing, energy, and the ability to exercise, with around 94 per cent saying that they would recommend the service to their friends and family.

–IANS

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