Healthy Living – Four Tips For Maintaining A Healthy Body Weight

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Healthy Living – Four Tips For Maintaining A Healthy Body Weight

get gastric sleeve surgeryLooking to maintain a healthy body weight in Ashburn?

Looking to maintain a healthy body weight? Whether you have been dieting in the last little while and have finally reached your goal weight or you simply are looking to ensure you do not gain weight going forward, there are a few tips that can assist in ensuring you stay on track.

Let us look at four different strategies you can use to keep your weight in check. Four strategies not requiring intricate calorie counting…

1. Add More Protein. If you hate counting calories but want to do your best to prevent weight gain, consider adding more protein to your diet plan. Protein is the nutrient tending to be the most satisfying, so is what you are least likely to overeat.

As a result, you will feel more satisfied after every meal. Thus your chances of eating more than you should go down. Aim to take in at least 15 grams of protein with each snack and 20 to 30 grams with each meal to achieve this effect.

2. Sip Water Throughout The Day. Dehydration can cause food cravings in many people, leading you to eat when you just needed to have a drink. To avoid this, sip water throughout the day. Carry a jug of water with you wherever you go and make a concentrated effort to drink it between meals.

It can help to get a gallon jug of water and fill it up once in the morning and then make sure by dinner time you have drunk it all. A gallon jug of water will provide a little extra over what you need but will be beneficial if you are also leading an active lifestyle.

3. Set Fitness Focused Goals. Do not fall into the trap of thinking once you have reached your body weight goal that is it. Set a new goal. Focus on something fitness related. Train for a 10km race or focus on adding 20 pounds to your squat or bench press exercise.

By having a new goal to work towards, you will help sustain better overall focus on your fitness plan, and this can lead to healthier eating efforts as well.

4. Allow For Indulgence. Finally, do not be too strict on yourself. Make sure you are allowing for overeating every so often. Remember your diet should make room for fun foods as well. Otherwise, it is not a diet you will want to be on for the long-term.

If you keep these tips in mind, you should have no problem sustaining a healthy body weight well into the months ahead.

Although managing Type 2 diabetes can be very challenging, it is not a condition you must just live with. Make simple changes to your daily routine – include exercise to help lower both your blood sugar levels and your weight.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9761472

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Weight-Loss Surgery: Durable in the Long-Term

Benefits of gastric bypass surgery

In a recent report about the long term benefits of gastric bypass surgery good results were still being seen 12 years post-operative, an observational study found.

People with severe obesity who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reported a sustained body weight reduction 12 years following surgery (-77.2 lbs from baseline, 95% CI -84.7 to -70.0, mean % change -26.9%), according to Ted D. Adams, PhD, MPH, of Intermountain Healthcare, and colleagues in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Previously reported 2-year and 6-year observational data from this cohort were published by the research group to assess the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent gastric bypass, and was later ” broadened to include the durability and long-term outcomes of gastric bypass compared to severely obese patients who did not undergo surgical intervention,” Adams told MedPage Today. “We hoped to see similar favorable outcomes at 12 years.”

With over a 90% follow-up rate at 12-years, the analysis included 1,156 severely obese patients — 418 of whom underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Comprising of two nonsurgical comparative groups, there were 417 patients who sought out surgery, but did not undergo surgery mainly due to insurance coverage (non-surgery group 1). ‘Nonsurgery group 2’ comprised of a total of 321 severely obese people, who did not seek out surgery. All nonsurgery participants were not provided with any study-based weight loss therapy, however, they were free to independently pursue such intervention. After 12 years, neither nonsurgery group achieved a significant mean change in weight loss:

  • Group 1: -6.4 lbs (-15.2 to -2.2, mean change -2.0%)
  • Group 2: -0.0 lbs (-7.7 to 7.7, mean change -0.9%)

Two years after gastric bypass, the surgery group reported a significant adjusted mean body weight change of -99.2 lbs from baseline (95 % CI -104.1 to 94.6 lb; mean percent change -35.0%). Similar benefits were also seen at 6 years out of surgery, with a sustained loss of -80.0 lbs mean body weight change from baseline (95% CI, -86.0 to -73.9 lb, mean percent change -28.0).

“The fact that the mean 12-year percent weight loss from baseline was very similar to that measured at 6 years follow-up was somewhat of a surprise,” Adams noted.

Weight loss wasn’t the only benefit sustained 12 years after surgery. Two years post-op, 75% of surgery patients with type 2 diabetes achieved remission (66 of 88), and 62% sustained 6-years post-op (54 of 87). At the 12-year follow-up, over half of patients who had type 2 diabetes at time of surgery remained in remission (43 of 84, 51%), with Adams calling this finding “encouraging.” The odds ratio for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 1 was 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.24), while the OR for incidence diabetes versus nonsurgery 2 was 0.09 (95% CI 0.03-0.29)(P<0.001 for both).

Rates of diabetes remission were largely predicted by therapies used at baseline. Surgery patients who were not receiving antidiabetic medications as baseline were more likely to achieve remission after surgery (73%, 95% CI 46-99, 16 of 22), while 56% of those who were receiving oral medications at baseline achieved post-op remission (95% CI 35-77, 24 of 43). Only 16% of patients receiving insulin with or without other oral agents at baseline achieved remission (95% CI -8 to 39, three of 19).

However, even in surgery patients who did not achieve remission, a significant improvement was still reported after 12 years, with a decreased mean in the amount of antidiabetic medications compared to both nonsurgery group 1 (-0.3± versus 0.8, P=0.002) and nonsurgery group 2 (-0.3 versus 1.1, P<0.001).

Several cardiovascular-related benefits were also reported after 12 years among the surgery group, with significant remission rates reported for HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to both nonsurgical groups. Long term hypertension benefit was also reported following surgical intervention, although rate of remission was only significant when compared to the first nonsurgical group (adjusted OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.7-15.6, P<0.001).

In a statement to MedPage Today, Paul Thodiyil, MD, director of the Bariatric Surgery Program at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, called this study “important,” and praised the long-term follow-up to assess the benefits of bariatric surgery, and specifically, the gastric bypass procedure.

“While, sadly, it confirms an increased incidence of suicides in those undergoing weight loss surgery [five in the surgery group; two in nonsurgery group 1], the overall gains are substantial,” said Thodiyil, referring to the significant weight loss and diabetes benefits sustained long term. He was not involved with the study,

 Adams said that his group hopes to continue to follow both the surgical and nonsurgical participant cohorts into the future

How to Control Your Hunger Hormones to Lose Weight and Keep It Off

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How to Control Your Hunger Hormones to Lose Weight and Keep It Off

Think of it as the gremlin making your stomach grumble.

Can you really reprogram your appetite?

Amanda Gardner

December 19, 2017

A symphony of factors control hunger, fullness, and ultimately our weight, including everything from how well you slept last night to the accounts you follow on Instagram. Also involved in the complex process are hormones, particularly the two that are often referred to as hunger hormones, leptin and ghrelin.

In an ideal world, leptin and ghrelin work together to help keep you at a healthy weight. In the real world, well, 70% of the population ends up overweight or obese. Could out-of-whack hormones be to blame?

To answer that question, you first have to understand how the so-called hunger hormones work.

Leptin is the satiety hormone. Essentially, it tells you when to stop eating. “It makes you feel full, and it blocks appetite,” says James Shoemaker, MD, PhD, associate professor in biochemistry and molecular biology at St. Louis University.

 Ghrelin, on the other hand, tells you when you’re hungry and need to eat. Think of it as the gremlin making your stomach grumble. “It’s made in the stomach primarily, and it’s released when you haven’t eaten for a while,” says Michael Schwartz, MD, co-director of the Diabetes Institute at the University of Washington in Seattle. Ghrelin peaks every four hours or so–roughly corresponding to breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

When everything’s running smoothly, the two hormones work in harmony, says Philadelphia-based Marjorie Nolan Cohn, RDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics. “As one is rising, the other one is dropping.”

But things can–and do–go wrong.

For starters, leptin levels fluctuate with how much fat you have. When you lose weight, leptin levels drop. With less of that appetite-suppressing hormone, you end up feeling hungrier and eating more, potentially causing you to gain back the weight you had lost. “[Once] you have returned to your baseline weight, leptin will have recovered,” explains Dr. Schwartz.

In fact, a study that looked at 14 former Biggest Loser contestants showed that, indeed, leptin levels declined in those who lost large amounts of weight (they lost an average of almost 130 pounds). That could explain why most of them regained much of the weight over time.

It’s also possible to become desensitized to leptin–called leptin resistance–if you are constantly stuffing yourself with food. “You’d think that if you’re eating a lot you shouldn’t be hungry, but it’s the opposite,” says Cohn, who is also author of The Belly Fat Fix: Taming Ghrelin, Your Hunger Hormone, for Quick, Healthy Weight Loss. “Even though there may be leptin in circulation, it’s not registering,” she says, and you don’t know you’re full.

Hunger-stimulating ghrelin levels also vary with weight loss. After dieting, ghrelin production increases, potentially causing people to eat more and gain weight. “The cravings can be so hard to control,” says Cohn. “Once you’re out of whack, it’s really hard to get back into balance.”

Why our bodies fight back

Understandably, human beings are designed to fight starvation. Part of the body’s response to dieting is a drive to revert to whatever weight we were previously. “As you gain weight, the brain thinks that the new weight is the one that’s supposed to be regulated,” says Dr. Schwartz. “That’s why it’s so hard to lose weight and keep it off.”

That response typically kicks in after you’ve lost around 5% to 7% of your bodyweight, he says. “Once you lose more than 5% of your bodyweight, on average, you’re going to engage these responses that counter-regulate against the weight loss. Whether you do it quickly or slowly, it doesn’t matter very much.”

Interestingly, people who undergo bariatric surgery seem to have lower levels of hunger-promoting ghrelin than people who take pounds off through plain old diet and exercise. This may be why weight loss after gastric bypass surgery tends to last for longer periods of time.

Harnessing your hormones

Barring surgery, is there any way you can control these hormones to your advantage? Luckily, yes.

If you can, stick to a more moderate weight loss of just around 5% of your bodyweight so you don’t trigger that debilitating drop in leptin. Then, readjust mealtime: “Eat on the clock,” says Cohn. That means every two hours if you like to eat smaller portions or every four hours if you eat larger meals. This draws down stomach-grumbling ghrelin levels.

It’s also important to eat a balance of foods at each meal, particularly protein and complex carbs. “Protein is a major player in suppressing ghrelin,” Cohn says. “It takes more work to digest and keeps you full longer.” Fiber also slows digestion and helps keep you full, she adds. Look for complex carbs like whole grains, veggies, and fruit, especially those containing a type of fiber known as “resistant starch,” like not-quite-ripe bananas.

Exercise may also help control your hunger hormones so you can shed pounds for good. One study found that losing weight on a treadmill resulted in lower ghrelin levels than slimming down by simply eating less.

This may be why weight loss after gastric bypass surgery tends to last for longer periods of time.

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Is It Possible to Lose Weight and Never Put It Back on Again?

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Is It Possible to Lose Weight and Never Put It Back on Again?Losing weight is relatively easy! The more difficult task is to maintain it. One of the most complaint subjects in terms of dieting and weight loss is related to maintaining your weight once you achieved your goals and not putting it back on.See all stories on this topic

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Obesity, diabetes combatting device safe for treatment

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A non-surgical and reversible device for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity is safe, effective and should be rolled out across the National Health Service (NHS), researchers say.

The device — Endobarrier — is a reversible treatment that provides people with an alternative to drastic gastric bypass surgery.

It prevents food from coming into contact with the first part of the small intestine, but without painful invasive surgery.

Endobarrier consists of a 60-cm-long tube-like liner or sleeve that coats the inside of the small intestine, allowing food to pass through but not to be absorbed, which can be removed after a year.

The procedure aims to kick start a change in lifestyle and help people achieve better health, improve diabetes control as well as promote weight loss, the researchers said.

The Endobarrier therapy could be “highly effective in patients with obesity and diabetes that has been very hard to treat, with high patient satisfaction levels, and an acceptable safety profile”, said Robert Ryder and colleagues from City Hospital, Birmingham

“The Endobarrier service could be a safe and cost-effective treatment for the NHS — it does not involve surgery and patients do not have to stay in hospital (so reducing the risk of infection),” Ryder added.

For the study, presented at 2017 European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Portugal, the team investigated whether this new therapy could be translated into major clinical success by creating a small NHS Endobarrier service for people having difficulties managing their Type 2 diabetes and obesity.

Participants reported considerable improvements in wellbeing, energy, and the ability to exercise, with around 94 per cent saying that they would recommend the service to their friends and family.

–IANS

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